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  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 27, 2014— Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 27, 2014— Hour 2

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Bishop Frank Kalabat: Are there still Christians in Iraq?

    • Description: ISIS has made it clear that they intend to rid their caliphate of all non-Muslims. Reports indicate that there are no Christians left in the ancient city of Mosul. Are there any Christians in Iraq at all? Bishop Frank Kalabat of the Chaldean diocese of St. Thomas the Apostle of Detroit, joins us with the latest developments from Iraq.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Bishop Frank Kalabat: Are there still Christians in Iraq? (continued)

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Chesterton: The Most Quotable Man in History

    • Description: GK Chesteron is widely considered to be one of the greatest Christian writers of the 20th century and heavily influenced the work of CS Lewis. He is especially known for his quotable writings and comments. Dale Ahlquist, president of the American Chesterton Society and co-founder of the Chesterton Academy, is with us discuss some of Chesterton’s greatest quotes.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Dale Ahlquist
        Dale Ahlquist is the president and co-founder of the American Chesterton Society and the publisher of its magazine,Gilbert. He is the creator and host of the television series, The Apostle of Common Sense, on the Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN). He is also the co-founder of Chesterton Academy, a Minneapolis-based high school rated one of the top 50 Catholic schools in the United States.
      • Resources:
  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 27, 2014

    Talking about the “things that matter most” on August 27.

     

    4:00 – The Most Controversial Decision: Truman, the Atomic Bomb, and the Defeat of Japan.

     

    Earlier this month we commemorated the anniversaries of the atomic bombs being dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Today we discuss the morality of the decision with Fr. Wilson Miscamble, author of The Most Controversial Decision: Truman, the Atomic Bombs, and the Defeat of Japan. We explore the American use of atomic bombs, the role these weapons played in the defeat of the Japanese Empire, and Harry Truman’s decision making regarding this most controversial of all his decisions.

      

    5:00 – Bishop Frank Kalabat: Are there still Christians in Iraq?

     

    ISIS has made it clear that they intend to rid their caliphate of all non-Muslims. Reports indicate that there are no Christians left in the ancient city of Mosul. Are there any Christians in Iraq at all? Bishop Frank Kalabat of the Chaldean diocese of St. Thomas the Apostle of Detroit, joins us with the latest developments from Iraq.

     

    5:20 – Kresta Comments: Westerners joining ISIS

     

    5:40 – Chesterton: The Most Quotable Man in History

     

    GK Chesteron is widely considered to be one of the greatest Christian writers of the 20th century and heavily influenced the work of CS Lewis. He is especially known for his quotable writings and comments. Dale Ahlquist, president of the American Chesterton Society and co-founder of the Chesterton Academy, is with us discuss some of Chesterton’s greatest quotes. 

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 26, 2014— Hour 1

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 26, 2014— Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Kresta Comments: Forced coverage of abortion— the next battle in the religious liberty fight

    + Segment #2 of 3

    An open letter to Richard Dawkins

    • Description: Last week, atheist Dr. Richard Dawkins said it is immoral to not abort babies who have Down’s syndrome. JD Flynn, an assistant to Bishop Conley of Lincoln, Nebraska and the adoptive father of two Down’s syndrome children, responded with a letter to Dawkins. JD told Dawkins that although his children suffer, they suffer with joy. He invited Dawkins to have dinner with the family and see if his children’s suffering really merited their deaths. JD is with us to talk about his letter and his experience raising two Down’s syndrome children.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Kresta Comments: The New Atheism

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 26, 2014— Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 26, 2014— Hour 2

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Kresta Comments: Why aren't Muslims speaking out against ISIS?

    + Segment #2 of 3

    The Catholic Guide to Depression

    • Description: The death of Robin Williams has sparked discussions about depression and suicide, particularly among Catholics. How does depression affect a person’s ability to make rational decisions? What causes depression? Can it be treated and, if so, how? Dr. Aaron Kheriaty, author of the “Catholic Guide to Depression,” gives us his insights.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Dr. Aaron Kheriaty
        Aaron Kheriaty is the Director of Residency Training and Medical Education in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, Irvine. He co-directs the Program in Medical Ethics in the School of Medicine, and serves as chairman of the clinical ethics committee at UCI Medical Center. Dr. Kheriaty graduated from the University of Notre Dame in philosophy and pre-medical sciences, and earned his MD degree from Georgetown University. He lives in San Juan Capistrano, California, with his wife and five sons.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    What Catholics need to know about their money

    • Description: With all the coverage of ISIS, riots in Ferguson, the border crisis, Ukraine and other issues, there hasn’t been much in the news lately on finances and the stock market. Yesterday, Burger King announced that they are considering buying Tim Horton’s and moving their base to Canada for lower corporate taxes. What does financial news mean for Catholics? George Schwartz, CEO of Schwartz Investment Counsel and co-manager of the Ave Maria Rising Dividend Fund, joins us to talk about how Catholics should look differently at their money and the markets.
    • Segment Guests:
      • George Schwartz
        George Schwartz is the Chairman and CEO of Schwartz Investment Counsel. He is also co-manager of the Ave Maria Rising Dividend Fund, the Ave Maria Catholic Values Fund, the Ave Maria Growth Fund and the Schwartz Value Fund
      • Resources:
  • Officials: American fighting for ISIS killed in Syria

    via CNN

    by Jim Sciutto and Greg Botelho

    An American named Douglas McCain was killed last weekend in Syria, where he was fighting for ISIS, two U.S. officials told CNN.

    The man’s uncle, Ken McCain, said that his nephew had gone to fight as a jihadi and that the U.S. State Department told the family Monday about the death.

    He died in a battle between rival extremist groups in the suburbs of Aleppo, Syria’s once-bustling commercial capital and largest city, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a British-based group that monitors the conflict.

    Like the U.S. officials, the group described McCain as an ISIS fighter and said he was killed in a battle with the al-Nusra Front, an al Qaeda-linked organization that the U.S. government has blacklisted as a foreign terror organization.

    According to his uncle, Douglas McCain’s journey to Syria began sometime after he converted several years ago from Christianity to Islam.

    The family wasn’t alarmed by his conversion, but they became aware of Facebook posts sympathetic to ISIS, an Islamist terror group, when he traveled to what they believed to be Turkey.

    U.S. counterterrorism investigators had been looking into Douglas McCain’s activities for some time before his death, one U.S. official said.

    He was among a list of Americans who are believed to have joined militant groups and who would be stopped and subjected to additional scrutiny if he traveled, according to the official.

    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has called ISIS, which claimed responsibility for the recent beheading ofAmerican journalist James Foley, “beyond just a terrorist group” and “beyond anything we have seen.”

    Whatever group he ended up with, the fact that Douglas McCain became a jihadi left his family “devastated” and “just as surprised as the country,” Ken McCain said.

    He described the nephew he knew as “a good person, loved his family, loved his mother, loved his faith” — the latter being a reference to the Christianity he practiced before his conversion.

     

    Douglas McCain isn’t the first American to fight for a militant group during Syria’s three-year civil war.

    In May, radical Islamists claimed in an online video and on social media that one attacker in a suicide bombing in northern Syria was an American whom they identified as Abu Hurayra Al-Amriki. Al-Amriki is Arabic for “the American.”

    Abu Farouk al Shamy, a spokesman for the rebel Suqour al-Sham battalion, said the attack was executed in coordination with the al-Nusra Front.

    U.S. officials later confirmed the Islamists’ boast that an American was involved in the attack. U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said he was believed to be Moner Mohammad Abu-Salha, a U.S. citizen who grew up in Florida and went to school there.

    Until now, the United States largely has limited its involvement in Syria to diplomatic efforts and supporting the “moderate opposition,” as described by Joint Chiefs Chairman Martin Dempsey and others, that is fighting to unseat Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

    That’s the same goal, ironically, as ISIS — which aims to rule a caliphate, known as the Islamic State, spanning Iraq and Syria.

    The United States began airstrikes this month on ISIS forces in Iraq, in support of Iraqi and Kurdish troops and to curb the Islamist extremists’ murderous advance.

    Syria could be next. Already, the United States has started gathering intelligence on the locations of ISIS leadership and troops in Syria, two U.S. officials previously told CNN. To this point, President Barack Obama has OK’d reconnaissance flights over the war-ravaged nation, according to a U.S. official.

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 26, 2014

    Talking about the “things that matter most” on August 26

     

    4:20 – An open letter to Richard Dawkins

     

    Last week, atheist Dr. Richard Dawkins said it is immoral to not abort babies who have Down’s syndrome.  JD Flynn, an assistant to Bishop Conley of Lincoln, Nebraska and the adoptive father of two Down’s syndrome children, responded with a letter to Dawkins. JD told Dawkins that although his children suffer, they suffer with joy. He invited Dawkins to have dinner with the family and see if his children’s suffering really merited their deaths. JD is with us to talk about his letter and his experience raising two Down’s syndrome children.   

     

    4:40 – Kresta Comments: The New Atheism

     

     

    5:00 – Kresta Comments

     

    5:20 – The Catholic Guide to Depression

     

    The death of Robin Williams has sparked discussions about depression and suicide, particularly among Catholics. How does depression affect a person’s ability to make rational decisions? What causes depression? Can it be treated and, if so, how? Dr. Aaron Kheriaty, author of the “Catholic Guide to Depression,” gives us his insights.

     

     

    5:40 – What Catholics need to know about their money

     

    With all the coverage of ISIS, riots in Ferguson, the border crisis, Ukraine and other issues, there hasn’t been much in the news lately on finances and the stock market. Yesterday, Burger King announced that they are considering buying Tim Horton’s and moving their base to Canada for lower corporate taxes.  What does financial news mean for Catholics? George Schwartz, CEO of Schwartz Investment Counsel and co-manager of the Ave Maria Rising Dividend Fund, joins us to talk about how Catholics should look differently at their money and the markets. 

  • ISIS demands $6.6 million ransom for American woman

    via ABC News

    by Brian Ross, Rhonda Schwartz and James Meek

    A third American hostage held by ISIS has been identified as a 26-year-old American woman who was kidnapped a year ago while doing humanitarian relief work in Syria. The terror group is demanding $6.6 million and the release of U.S. prisoners for the life of the young woman, who the family requested not be identified.

    She is the third of at least four Americans who were known to be held by ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. American journalist James Foley was executed by the group in a video that appeared online last week. Another writer, Steven Sotloff, was seen alive but under duress in the same footage.

    In addition to the multi-million dollar ransom, the terror group has also demanded that the U.S. release Aafia Siddiqui, an MIT-trained neuroscientist who was convicted by the U.S. in 2010 of trying to kill U.S. officials two years before, according to a supporter of Siddiqui who has been in contact with the hostage’s family.
    Siddiqui’s release has been a regular demand of groups critical of U.S. policy in the Middle East and Southwest Asia, but Monday Siddiqui’s family spoke out through supporters to say they were “very distraught” Siddiqui’s name was invoked with the ransom request and sought to distance themselves from ISIS.

    “If the issue is true, we would like to state that our family does not have any connections to such groups or actions,” reads a letter written by Siddiqui’s family. “We believe in a struggle that is peaceful and dignified. Associating Aafia’s name with acts of violence is against everything we are struggling for.”

    “While we deeply appreciate the sincere feelings of those who, like us, wish to see the freedom of our beloved Aafia, we isiscannot agree with a ‘by any means necessary’ approach to Aafia’s freedom. Nor can we accept that someone else’s daughter or sister suffer like Aafia is suffering,” the letter says.

    The Siddiqui family has been “traumatized by the thoughts that someone else could be harmed in the name of Aafia,” said Mauri Saalakhan of the Peace and Justice Foundation, who held a sparsely attended press conference Monday and spoke on behalf of the Siddiqui family.

    “They’re opposed to it. In their letter to ISIS they made it very clear, this is not the way, these are not the conditions under which we want our loved ones released,” Saalakhan said. “Nor did they want harm to come to anyone else’s loved one in the name of Aafia… They conveyed that message loud and clear.

    “The most important message that I could convey to ISIS or whoever it is that’s holding these innocent people captive abroad is that at the end of the day, this type of approach in response to an injustice that you feel, is not only not the inappropriate way to go, but, properly understood, it is a violation of the tenets of the faith that we claim to believe in,” he said. “We just have to do the right thing because it is the right thing, without any strings attached.. And the right thing would be to let this young woman go back to her family, go back to her life. And the right thing for America to do, for our government… would be to do the same with Dr. Aafia Siddiqui.”

    The details of the ISIS ransom demand and the abduction of the young aid worker were disclosed by Saalakhan and a close friend of the unnamed hostage family in statements to ABC News Monday.

    Each of the three known surviving American hostages in ISIS’s hands have been threatened with death since Foley’s execution, sources have told ABC News. In the video that showed Foley’s death, a masked militant said that Sotloff’s fate rested in President Obama’s hands – an apparent demand that the U.S. stop airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq.

    The day after Foley’s execution video emerged online, the U.S. military announced it had continued bombing runs against ISIS in Iraq and overnight The New York Times reported President Obama has approved surveillance flights over Syria, what the paper called a potential precursor to airstrikes there.

  • Jim Foley’s letter home

    Jim Foley is the American journalist who was brutally murdered by ISIS in a video released last week. In the days following his death, a letter surfaced that he wrote after an earlier release. In that beautiful letter, he described how his Catholic faith, particularly the Rosary, helped him get through his ordeal. He tried to write other letters home during his second captivity but they were all confiscated. He dictated this letter to a fellow captive about the be released. Jim’s friend memorized the letter and passed it on to the Foley family after he returned to the US.  

    Dear Family and Friends,

    I remember going to the Mall with Dad, a very long bike ride with Mom. I remember so many great family times that take me away from this prison. Dreams of family and friends take me away and happiness fills my heart.

    I know you are thinking of me and praying for me. And I am so thankful. I feel you all especially when I pray. I pray for you to stay strong and to believe. I really feel I can touch you even in this darkness when I pray.

    Eighteen of us have been held together in one cell, which has helped me. We have had each other to have endless long conversations about movies, trivia, sports. We have played games made up of scraps found in our cell…we have found ways to play checkers, Chess, and Risk… and have had tournaments of competition, spending some days preparing strategies for the next day’s game or lecture. The games and teaching each other have helped the time pass. They have been a huge help. We repeat stories and laugh to break the tension.

    I have had weak and strong days. We are so grateful when anyone is freed; but of course, yearn for our own freedom. We try to encourage each other and share strength. We are being fed better now and daily. We have tea, occasional coffee. I have regained most of my weight lost last year.

    I think a lot about my brothers and sister. I remember playing Werewolf in the dark with Michael and so many other adventures. I think of chasing Mattie and T around the kitchen counter. It makes me happy to think of them. If there is any money left in my bank account, I want it to go to Michael and Matthew. I am so proud of you, Michael and thankful to you for happy childhood memories and to you and Kristie for happy adult ones.

    And big John, how I enjoyed visiting you and Cress in Germany. Thank you for welcoming me. I think a lot about RoRo and try to imagine what Jack is like. I hope he has RoRo’s personality!

    And Mark… so proud of you too Bro. I think of you on the West coast and hope you are doing some snowboarding and camping, I especially remember us going to the Comedy Club in Boston together and our big hug after. The special moments keep me hopeful.

    Katie, so very proud of you. You are the strongest and best of us all!! I think of you working so hard, helping people as a nurse. I am so glad we texted just before I was captured. I pray I can come to your wedding…. now I am sounding like Grammy!!

    Grammy, please take your medicine, take walks and keep dancing. I plan to take you out to Margarita’s when I get home. Stay strong because I am going to need your help to reclaim my life.

    Jim

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 1

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Desire of the Everlasting Hills

    • Description: This film provides intimate and candid portraits of three Catholics trying to navigate the waters of self-understanding, faith, and homosexuality. It takes humility and courage to face certain questions about our lives. One such question is, “How do I know if I am designing my life well? By what standard can I come to a conclusion?” This question is closely linked with another, “What is the purpose of my life? What does it mean to be fulfilled and at peace?” And these are the central questions around which the film turns. One of the people featured in the film is Dan Mattson, a gregarious artist who spent his life hiding a deep sense of isolation from those who loved him. Dan joins us.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Desire of the Everlasting Hills (continued)

    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    The rise in Muslim converts to Christianity

    • Description: According to a thesis by Dr. Duane Miller, since the 1960’s there has been a marked increase in the number of known conversions from Islam to Christianity. He asks whether certain of these ex-Muslim Christians engage in the process of theology-making and, if so, it asks what these theologies claim to know about God and humans’ relation to God. Dr. Miller is here to discuss that question.
    • Segment Guests:
  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 25, 2014— Hour 2

    • Series Details: This program is part of a series titled kpm_20140825_2.mp3.

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Teachable Moments: Using Everyday Encounters with Media and Culture to Instill Conscience, Character and Faith.

    • Description: Never have Christian families been so challenged by the world around them to instill and instruct their children in the tenets of their faith. Moral relativism literally seeps into every facet of family life and saturates our popular culture. A ubiquitous media presence that defines our daily experience also is defining the attitudes and behaviors of those who consume it. Yet within this pervasive secular culture, Christian families encounter “teachable moments,” those unplanned but unmatched opportunities to put their faith into action and live out the values and virtues embodied in Jesus Christ. When looking for teachable moments, parents, and coaches must approach each day with intentionality, seeking out and capitalizing on opportunities to incorporate life lessons into every day experiences amid the culture. Author Marybeth Hicks joins us to discuss her latest book.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Marybeth Hicks
        Marybeth Hicks is a weekly columnist for The Washington Times and the founder and editor of OntheCulture.com, a blog for American women about the things that matter most. A frequent commentator on cultural issues, she has appeared on national television outlets including Fox News Channel’s Hannity, and Fox and Friends, the CBS Evening News, the Christian Broadcasting Network’s 700 Club, and on dozens of national and regional radio programs. She currently serves on the advisory board of the Parents Television Council, an organization seeking to promote decency on the airwaves.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Teachable Moments (continued)

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Teachable Moments (continued)

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