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  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 20, 2014 — Hour 1

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 20, 2014 — Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Live report from Erbil, Iraq

    • Description: ISIS atrocities in Iraq continue. Yesterday, the terrorist group released a video showing the execution of American journalist James Foley. The Malteser International assessment team will be in the northern Iraqi city of Erbil for at least the next three months as they provide aid to the thousands of Christians, Yazidis and other minorities who have fled their homes from ISIS persecution. Oliver Hochedez, the head of the assessment team, and Fr. Paulus Sati, a mission advisor, join us live from Iraq to talk about their team's mission.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    OKC Archbishop Coakley files lawsuit against satanic group

    • Description: Attorneys for the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City have filed a lawsuit against the satanic group planning to host a black Mass next month. The lawsuit says that, by using a consecrated Host, the group has stolen Church property. Lead attorney Michael Caspino is with us to talk about it.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Kresta Comments: Obama: “No faith teaches people to massacre innocents”

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon” — August 20, 2014 — Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon” — August 20, 2014 — Hour 2

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Race in America: A wide-ranging discussion

    • Description: Tensions in Ferguson, Missouri continue in the wake of Michael Brown’s death. The situation once again raises questions about the state of race relations in America. Pastor Levon Yuille, National Director of the National Black Pro-Life Congress, has been a community activist in Ypsilanti, Michigan for more than thirty years. Pastor Levon joins us with his take on the state of race in America.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Dr. Levon Yuille
        Dr. Yuille is the pastor of the Bible Church in Ypsilanti, Michigan, National Director of the National Black Pro-Life Congress and the host of Joshua’s Trail radio program on WDTK in Detroit.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Race in America: A wide-ranging discussion (continued)

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Race in America: A wide-ranging discussion (continued)

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 20, 2014

    Talking about the “things that matter most” on August 20

     

    4:00 – Live report from Erbil, Iraq

     

    ISIS atrocities in Iraq continue. Yesterday, the terrorist group released a video showing the execution of American journalist James Foley. The Malteser International assessment team will be in the northern Iraqi city of Erbil for at least the next three months as they provide aid to the thousands of Christians, Yazidis and other minorities who have fled their homes from ISIS persecution. Oliver Hochedez, the head of the assessment team, and Fr. Paulus Sati, a mission advisor, join us live from Iraq to talk about their team’s mission.

     

     

    4:20 – OKC Archbishop Coakley files lawsuit against satanic group

     

    Attorneys for the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City have filed a lawsuit against the satanic group planning to host a black Mass next month. The lawsuit says that, by using a consecrated Host, the group has stolen Church property. Lead attorney Michael Caspino is with us to talk about it.

     

    4:40 – Kresta Comments: Obama: “No faith teaches people to massacre innocents” 

     

    5:00 – Race in America: A wide-ranging discussion

    Tensions in Ferguson, Missouri continue in the wake of Michael Brown’s death. The situation once again raises questions about the state of race relations in America. Pastor Levon Yuille, National Director of the National Black Pro-Life Congress, has been a community activist in Ypsilanti, Michigan for more than thirty years. Pastor Levon joins us with his take on the state of race in America. 

  • BREAKING: Archbishop Coakley Files Lawsuit Against Black Mass Organizers

    Attorney Michael Caspino joins Kresta in the Afternoon today (8/20) at 4:20 Eastern Time. 

    via the National Catholic Register

    by Brian Fraga

    Attorneys for the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City filed a lawsuit at noon today to stop the satanic black mass that organizers are planning to stage next month in the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall.

    The lawsuit asks the Oklahoma County Sheriff‘s Office to retrieve the consecrated host that the event‘s organizers claim to have, and return it to Oklahoma City Archbishop Paul Coakley. The lawsuit also argues that the consecrated host was obtained under fraudulent circumstances, and thus it must be returned to the archdiocese.

    “Our contention is that they are in possession of stolen property,” Archbishop Coakley told the Register. “They cannot archbishop coakleycomplete their satanic ritual without a consecrated host, and they have no means of acquiring one except through theft. We are asking the court to order them to return it immediately to me.”

    Archbishop Coakley added that the archdiocese, in consulting with the attorneys who filed the lawsuit, formulated a sound argument rooted in canon and civil law.

    “We are trusting the court will recognize that and act accordingly,” the archbishop said. “We hope this is a way that we can prevent the desecration of the Eucharist from taking place by removing from their possession what they have obtained illegally, that is the consecrated host.”

    Michael Caspino, one of two attorneys who filed the lawsuit on behalf of the archdiocese in Oklahoma District Court said the legal argument for the case is simple: “A consecrated Eucharist belongs to the Church.”

    Caspino, the CEO and partner at the Busch & Caspino law firm in Irvine, Calif., told the Register that the Church has exercised “dominion and control” over the Eucharist for more than 2,000 years. The lawsuit provides information on Church processes set up to safeguard the consecrated host.

    “The Satanists procured the consecrated host by illicit means, theft or fraud,” Caspino said. “We are simply asking the court to return the stolen property to its rightful owner, the Roman Catholic Church.”

    Named as defendants are Adam Daniels, an Oklahoma County resident, and Dakhma of Angra Mainyu, a group that has
    rented the Oklahoma City Civic Center’s 88-seat City Theater to stage the black mass on Sept. 21. Daniels, a member of Dakhma of Angra Mainyu, has told various media outlets that a friend mailed him the consecrated host, and that it will be desecrated, “stomped on” and destroyed during the satanic ritual.

    Daniels, who has been involved in organizing public Satanist events in Oklahoma City since 2010, is a registered sex offender.

     

    Profanation of the Catholic Mass

    The black mass is a sacrilegious ceremony structured in imitation of the Catholic Mass. Invoking Satan, the ritual is centered around the desecration of the Eucharist, which is generally done by stealing a consecrated host from a Catholic church and using it in a profane sexual ritual or defecating and urinating on it. On its website, the Dakhma of Angra Mainyu says its event will be “toned down” so as not to violate Oklahoma state laws against nudity, public urination and sex acts.

    The Oklahoma black mass has generated outrage among Catholics across the country. More than 50,000 people have signed an online petition to shut down the event. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallon released a statement on Aug. 11 condemning the black mass as a “disgusting mockery of the Catholic faith” that should be “equally repellent to Catholics and non-Catholics alike.”

    The situation in Oklahoma comes just three months after a Harvard University student club tried sponsoring a black mass on campus. Hundreds of Catholics from across Massachusetts and New England participated in a May 12 procession and Eucharistic holy hour in the Church of St. Paul in Harvard Yard. The Harvard student club subsequently canceled the black mass, though a scaled-down version of it, without the club’s sponsorship, was reportedly later held in an off-campus Chinese restaurant.

    Archbishop Coakley said the publicly planned black mass in Oklahoma surprised him and many others given that Oklahoma is a “very conservative state” with many church-going people.

    “It seems as if it would be an unlikely place for such an attack to take place,” Archbishop Coakley said. “Unfortunately, it has indeed taken up a lot of our time, energy and attention to resist this, but if we are able to stop this, it will be time and energy well-spent.”

    The archbishop also said he is encouraged by numerous messages that he has received from virtually every continent expressing support and solidarity with the Oklahoma Catholic community.

    “I’m kind of holding my breath to see what’s next and see what becomes of [the lawsuit],” he said. “I’m hopeful, praying that it will achieve the end for which we desire, which is the prevention of the desecration of the Eucharist and stopping this public sacrilege from taking place.”

    Read More

  • A letter from James Foley, journalist murdered by ISIS

    James Foley was captured in Syria in November 2012. On August 19, 2014 ISIS released a video of Mr. Foley telling the US that there would be consequences for US airstrikes against the Islamic State. He was then executed. Mr. Foley was also detained for 44 days in Libya during the Libyan Civil War in April 2011. After his release he published this letter in the magazine of Marquette University, his Alma Mater. 

    via Marquette Magazine

    Phone call home

    A letter from James Foley, Arts ’96, to Marquette.

    Marquette University has always been a friend to me. The kind who challenges you to do more and be better and ultimately shapes who you become.

    With Marquette, I went on some volunteer trips to South Dakota and Mississippi and learned I was a sheltered kid and the world had real problems. I came to know young people who wanted to give their hearts for others. Later I volunteered in a Milwaukee junior high school up the street from the university and was inspired to become an inner-city teacher. But Marquette was perhaps never a bigger friend to me than when I was imprisoned as a journalist.

    Myself and two colleagues had been captured and were being held in a military detention center in Tripoli. Each day brought increasing worry that our moms would begin to panic. My colleague, Clare, was supposed to call her mom on her birthday, which was the day after we were captured. I had still not fully admitted to myself that my mom knew what had happened. But I kept telling Clare my mom had a strong faith.

    I prayed she’d know I was OK. I prayed I could communicate through some cosmic reach of the universe to her.

    I began to pray the rosary. It was what my mother and grandmother would have prayed. 
I said 10 Hail Marys between each Our Father. It took a long time, almost an hour to count 100 Hail Marys off on my knuckles. And it helped to keep my mind focused.

    Clare and I prayed together out loud. It felt energizing to speak our weaknesses and hopes together, as if in a conversation with God, rather than silently and alone.

    Later we were taken to another prison where the regime kept hundreds of political prisoners. I was quickly welcomed by the other prisoners and treated well.

    One night, 18 days into our captivity, some guards brought me out of the cell. In the hall I saw Manu, another colleague, for the first time in a week. We were haggard but overjoyed to see each other. Upstairs in the warden’s office, a distinguished man in a suit stood and said, “We felt you might want to call your families.”

    I said a final prayer and dialed the number. My mom answered the phone. “Mom, Mom, it’s me, Jim.”

    “Jimmy, where are you?”

    “I’m still in Libya, Mom. I’m sorry about this. So sorry.”

    “Don’t be sorry, Jim,” she pleaded. “Oh, Daddy just left. Oh … He so wants to talk to you. How are you, Jim?” I told her I was being fed, that I was getting the best bed and being treated like a guest.

    “Are they making you say these things, Jim?”

    “No, the Libyans are beautiful people,” I told her. “I’ve been praying for you to know that I’m OK,” I said. “Haven’t you felt my prayers?”

    “Oh, Jimmy, so many people are praying for you. All your friends, Donnie, Michael Joyce, Dan Hanrahan, Suree, Tom Durkin, Sarah Fang have been calling. Your brother Michael loves you so much.” She started to cry. “The Turkish embassy is trying to see you and also Human Rights Watch. Did you see them?” I said I hadn’t.

    “They’re having a prayer vigil for you at Marquette. Don’t you feel our prayers?” she asked.

    “I do, Mom, I feel them,” and I thought about this for a second. Maybe it was others’ prayers strengthening me, keeping me afloat.

    The official made a motion. I started to say goodbye. Mom started to cry. “Mom, I’m strong. I’m OK. I should be home by Katie’s graduation,” which was a month away.

    “We love you, Jim!” she said. Then I hung up.

    I replayed that call hundreds of times in my head — my mother’s voice, the names of my friends, her knowledge of our situation, her absolute belief in the power of prayer. She told me my friends had gathered to do anything they could to help. I knew I wasn’t alone.

    My last night in Tripoli, I had my first Internet connection in 44 days and was able to listen to a speech Tom Durkin gave for me at the Marquette vigil. To a church full of friends, alums, priests, students and faculty, I watched the best speech a brother could give for another. It felt like a best man speech and a eulogy in one. It showed tremendous heart and was just a glimpse of the efforts and prayers people were pouring forth. If nothing else, prayer was the glue that enabled my freedom, an inner freedom first and later the miracle of being released during a war in which the regime had no real incentive to free us. It didn’t make sense, but faith did.

  • Islamic State video claims to show beheading of U.S. journalist

    The video released by Reuters does show the actual execution. It only shows Mr. Foley’s speech and the terrorist’s warning. It is still distressing to watch and viewer discretion is advised. Click here to view the video. 

    via Reuters

    by Alexander Dziadosz and Michael Georgy

    Islamic State militants posted a video on Tuesday that purported to show the beheading of American journalist James Foley in revenge for U.S. air strikes against the insurgents in Iraq.

    The video, titled “A Message To America,” also showed images of another U.S. journalist, Steven Sotloff, whose life Islamic State said depended on how the United States acts in Iraq.

    The gruesome video presented President Barack Obama with bleak options that could define America’s involvement in Iraq and the public reaction to it, potentially dragging him further into a conflict he built much of his presidency on ending.

    Obama held back from making a public statement about the beheading until the video could be formally authenticated.

    “If genuine, we are appalled by the brutal murder of an innocent American journalist and we express our deepest condolences to his family and friends,” White House National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said in a statement.

    Other political leaders were swift to react.

    British Prime Minister David Cameron interrupted his holiday to return to London to lead the hunt to identify the man shown killing Foley, who spoke on the video with a British accent.

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said he was not surprised to hear the British accent and that large numbers of British nationals were fighting in Iraq and Syria.

    “Our intelligence services will be looking very carefully on both sides of the Atlantic at this video to establish its authenticity, to try to identify the individual concerned and then we will work together to try to locate him,” Hammond told Sky news.

    French President Francois Hollande called for an international conference to discuss how to tackle Islamic State.

    GRISLY MESSAGE

    Iraqi Foreign Minister Hoshiyar Zebari urged the world to back his country against Islamic State, which he described as a threat to the world, not just to the minority ethnic groups whose members it has killed in Iraq.

    Germany and Italy said they were ready to send arms to bolster the military capabilities of Iraqi Kurds fighting Islamic State in northern Iraq.

    The video’s grisly message was unambiguous, warning of greater retaliation to come against Americans following nearly two weeks of U.S. air strikes that have pounded militant positions and halted the advance of Islamic State, which until this month had captured a third of Iraq with little resistance.

    Foley, 40, was kidnapped by armed men on Nov. 22, 2012, in northern Syria while on his way to the Turkish border, according to GlobalPost, a Boston-based online publication where Foley had worked as a freelancer. He had reported in the Middle East for five years and had been kidnapped and released in Libya.

    Sotloff, who appeared at the end of the video, went missing in northern Syria while reporting in July 2013. He has written for TIME among other news organizations.

    On Facebook, Foley’s mother Diane Foley said: “We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people.

    “We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world.”

    The video was posted after the United States resumed air strikes in Iraq this month for the first time since the end of the U.S. occupation in 2011.

     

    Read More

  • Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue slams Islamists

    via Crisis Magazine

    by William Kilpatrick

    William KilpatrickIn reaction to the depredations of the Islamic State in Iraq, the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue issued a statement last week strongly condemning the militants. The statement also called on religious leaders, “especially Muslims,” to condemn the crimes and denounce “the use of religion to justify them.” “If not,” it asks, “what credibility will religions, their followers, and their leaders have? What credibility can the interreligious dialogue that we have patiently pursued over recent years have?”

    On the one hand, the statement is a positive sign. The veil of illusion about Islam, it appears, may at last be lifting. Since the Council for Interreligious Dialogue has probably done more than any other Catholic organization to keep alive the illusion that the Islamic faith is just like ours, it’s significant that they are calling on their Muslim counterparts to take a stand against Islamist aggression. Up until now, the Pontifical Council has been excessively concerned with the sensibilities of Islamic religious leaders. The new tone suggests a recognition that they also have a responsibility for the lives of Christians who are threatened by Islamists. With its detailed list of unacceptable Islamist practices, the statement indicates a willingness to take a more realistic view of Islam.

    On the other hand, there are a few indications that illusions die hard. The statement is hedged with language which suggests that the bishops still don’t get it—“it” being a clear understanding of Islamic faith, tradition, and history. The main thing to grasp is that Islam is a political religion. It’s as much about power as about piety. Indeed, exercising your power over others is considered to be a valid expression of piety—as in the music videos on Al-Aqsa TV, which proclaim that “Killing Jews is worship that draws us close to Allah.”

    In several places, the statement calls on Islamic leaders to “condemn the use of religion as a false justification for terrorism.” “No cause, and certainly no religion, can justify such barbarity,” says the document. That’s true if you equate “religion” with Christianity, but the religion of Islam can and does justify barbarity—although, from the Islamic point of view, what Allah commands is not barbarity, but simple justice.

    The statement calls on “followers of all religions” to condemn a list of outrages committed by the Islamic State. It’s not clear, however, if the authors of the statement fully realize what they are asking. A devoted follower of the prophet can’t very well condemn these practices because most of them belong to the warp and woof of Islam. A Muslim who rejects them tears at the very fabric of the faith.

    Take the first item on the list: “the massacre of people on the sole basis of their religious affiliation.” It seems that all reasonable people could unite in condemning that one, but, as it turns out, the Koran contains numerous passages justifying the slaying of unbelievers simply because they are non-Muslims (e.g. 9:5, 9:29, 8:39, 9:123). Next on the list is “the despicable practice of beheading, crucifying, and hanging bodies in public places.” Yet verse 47:4 of the Koran says, “When you meet the unbelievers in the battlefield, strike off their heads,” and Muhammad himself ordered the beheading of between 700 and 900 members of a Jewish tribe of Medina that had surrendered to his forces. Crucifixion? According to verse 5:33, “Those that make war against God and His apostle and spread disorder in the land shall be slain or crucified or have their hands and feet cut off on alternate sides, or be banished from the land.”

    The third item of condemnation is “the choice imposed on Christians and Yezidis between conversion to Islam, payment of isis groupa tax (jizya), or forced exile.” In July, the Islamic State offered an ultimatum to Northern Iraq’s dwindling Christian population: “We offer them three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract—involving payment of jizya; if they refuse this they will have nothing but the sword.” Once again, this is no idiosyncratic interpretation invented by ISIS, but a well-established Islamic practice. Verse 9:29 of the Koran exhorts Muslims to fight Christians until they pay the jizya and feel themselves subdued, and the triple choice is spelled out in detail in one of the Hadith (the words and sayings of Muhammad):

    When you meet your enemies who are polytheists [which includes Christians], invite them to three courses of action … [accept] Islam; if they respond to you, accept it from them and desist from fighting against them.… If they refuse to accept Islam, demand from them the Jizya. If they agree to pay, accept it from them and hold off your hands. If they refuse to pay the tax, seek Allah’s help and fight them. (Sahih Muslim 19:4294)

    Read More

  • Kresta in the Afternoon – August 20, 2014 – Hour 1

    Kresta in the Afternoon – August 20, 2014 – Hour 1

    • Description: Kresta in the Afternoon is what Catholic radio has been missing: a daily conversation - personal, authentic and human. It looks at all of life through the lens of Scripture and the teaching tradition of the Catholic Church. The scope is not limited to spiritual subjects...our host Al Kresta talks abortion, war, peace, dissent, old age, New Age, heavy metal, light eating, politics, church affairs, current events, family and marriage, movies and media, theology and apologetics, sports, crime and business. It's talk radio where God matters.
  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”—August 19, 2014— Hour 1

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”—August 19, 2014— Hour 1

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Ferguson: The Prayers, the Protests and the Pathetic Media

    • Description: In the days since Michael Brown’s death in Missouri, protests and riots have broken out. Many people are peacefully protesting, while others are resorting to violence and looting. Law enforcement has responded with riot shields, tear gas and rubber bullets. Teresa Tomeo was in Ferguson early this week, and she joins us with her observations on the unrest in the city and how the media is covering it.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Teresa Tomeo
        Teresa Tomeo is an author, syndicated Catholic talk show host, and motivational speaker with more than 30 years of experience in TV, radio and newspaper and spent 19 of those years working in front of a camera as a reporter/anchor in the Detroit market. In the year 2000, Teresa left the secular media to start her own speaking and communications company, Teresa Tomeo Communications, LLC. Her weekday morning radio program, Catholic Connection, is produced by Ave Maria Radio in Ann Arbor, Michigan and now heard on over 200 Catholic stations nationwide through the EWTN Global Catholic Radio Network and is also carried on Sirius Satellite Radio.
      • Resources:

    + Segment #2 of 3

    Global Crossings: Immigration, Civilization and America

    • Description: Global Crossings cuts through the jungle of myth, falsehood, and misrepresentation that dominates the immigration debate, clarifying the causes and consequences of human migration. Author Alvaro Llosa first looks at the immigrant experience, which connects the present to the past, and America to the rest of the world, and explores who immigrants are and why they move. He reviews such topics as religion, education, entrepreneurial spirit, and attitudes toward the receiving society, and analyzes economic factors that include jobs, wages, education, and the welfare state. Alvaro joins us.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Global Crossings: Immigration, Civilization and America (continued)

  • “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 19, 2014 — Hour 2

    “Kresta in the Afternoon”— August 19, 2014 — Hour 2

    + Segment #1 of 3

    Kresta Comments: God has no grandchildren—Why adult Christians fall away from the Faith.

    + Segment #2 of 3

    The Bible and Economic Justice

    • Description: Tim Gray, the president and an associate professor of Sacred Scripture at the Augustine Institute, joins us to discuss what the Bible says about economic justice.
    • Segment Guests:

    + Segment #3 of 3

    Attending to Kenya’s poorest children

    • Description: More than half of Kenya’s population is younger than 15 and 46% of the population lives on less than $1 per day. Cross Catholic Outreach is committed to helping provide education and nutrition for Kenya’s children. A donation of $110 will give a child meals and a strong Catholic education for one year. Outreach President Jim Cavnar joins us.
    • Segment Guests:
      • Jim Cavnar
        Jim is the President Cross Catholic Outreach
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