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PARENTHOOD: Stains, Spills, Sleeplessness…and Love

By Kathy Schiffer

If you’re a parent, you know that the early years of childrearing are a mix of joy and sheer exhaustion.
A new commercial by Argentine creative ideas agency Santo Buenos Aires captures the fatigue and the frustration, the bedlam and the bemusement, and the pure love that makes it all worthwhile.  The commercial by director Pucho Mentasti is for Coke Life, a new, green-label Argentine concoction that’s sweetened with a sugar and stevia extract for a 35-calorie serving.
Sebastian Wilhelm, Santo’s executive creative director, said,
“Having children is not just life’s most important moment, but the ultimate test to connecting with your best side.  Coke Life is a new kind of Coke.  We’re just starting to build this brand, setting up its world, its tone of voice.  We were aiming for ‘emotional comedy’ [with this ad].  The kind that makes you smile and weep at the same time.”
It worked with me!  I think you’ll love it, too.

PARENTHOOD: Stains, Spills, Sleeplessness…and Love

By Kathy Schiffer

If you’re a parent, you know that the early years of childrearing are a mix of joy and sheer exhaustion.
A new commercial by Argentine creative ideas agency Santo Buenos Aires captures the fatigue and the frustration, the bedlam and the bemusement, and the pure love that makes it all worthwhile.  The commercial by director Pucho Mentasti is for Coke Life, a new, green-label Argentine concoction that’s sweetened with a sugar and stevia extract for a 35-calorie serving.
Sebastian Wilhelm, Santo’s executive creative director, said,
“Having children is not just life’s most important moment, but the ultimate test to connecting with your best side.  Coke Life is a new kind of Coke.  We’re just starting to build this brand, setting up its world, its tone of voice.  We were aiming for ‘emotional comedy’ [with this ad].  The kind that makes you smile and weep at the same time.”
It worked with me!  I think you’ll love it, too.

PARENTHOOD: Stains, Spills, Sleeplessness…and Love

By Kathy Schiffer

If you’re a parent, you know that the early years of childrearing are a mix of joy and sheer exhaustion.
A new commercial by Argentine creative ideas agency Santo Buenos Aires captures the fatigue and the frustration, the bedlam and the bemusement, and the pure love that makes it all worthwhile.  The commercial by director Pucho Mentasti is for Coke Life, a new, green-label Argentine concoction that’s sweetened with a sugar and stevia extract for a 35-calorie serving.
Sebastian Wilhelm, Santo’s executive creative director, said,
“Having children is not just life’s most important moment, but the ultimate test to connecting with your best side.  Coke Life is a new kind of Coke.  We’re just starting to build this brand, setting up its world, its tone of voice.  We were aiming for ‘emotional comedy’ [with this ad].  The kind that makes you smile and weep at the same time.”
It worked with me!  I think you’ll love it, too.

PARENTHOOD: Stains, Spills, Sleeplessness…and Love

By Kathy Schiffer

If you’re a parent, you know that the early years of childrearing are a mix of joy and sheer exhaustion.
A new commercial by Argentine creative ideas agency Santo Buenos Aires captures the fatigue and the frustration, the bedlam and the bemusement, and the pure love that makes it all worthwhile.  The commercial by director Pucho Mentasti is for Coke Life, a new, green-label Argentine concoction that’s sweetened with a sugar and stevia extract for a 35-calorie serving.
Sebastian Wilhelm, Santo’s executive creative director, said,
“Having children is not just life’s most important moment, but the ultimate test to connecting with your best side.  Coke Life is a new kind of Coke.  We’re just starting to build this brand, setting up its world, its tone of voice.  We were aiming for ‘emotional comedy’ [with this ad].  The kind that makes you smile and weep at the same time.”
It worked with me!  I think you’ll love it, too.

“Be Vigilant”: Pope Offers Encouragement for Radio and TV Broadcasters

“I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
--Pope Francis
addressing broadcasters from
Italy’s national radio station, RAI
on January 18, 2014

In 2014, Italy’s national radio station, RAI, is marking its 90th anniversary in radio and its 60th anniversary in television. 

For the double anniversary, directors and staff of RAI were welcomed in a special papal audience this morning in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall. 

Pope Francis reminded broadcasters of their responsibility to maintain high ethical standards and to produce media that promotes human growth.  The pope expressed his appreciation for decades of thoughtful programming, noting that through RAI radio and television, Italians have always been able to access the words and images of the Pope and to follow Church events including the Second Vatican Council, papal elections, papal visits in Italy, the Jubilee Year, and the funeral of John Paul II.

Vatican Radio offered a full report:

The Pope said the keyword he wanted to highlight on the occasion of these two anniversaries is “collaboration”, in particular the decades-long collaboration between the RAI and the Vatican’s radio and television broadcasters.
The Pope also acknowledged the broadcaster’s various religious productions over the years and its role in documenting change in Italian society and in unifying Italy both linguistically and culturally.
“Recalling such a rich history of accomplishments also calls us to a renewed sense of responsibility,” he said. “I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
The broadcaster “produces culture and education, offers information and entertainment, which at every time of day, reaches a large number of Italians.”
“It is a responsibility to which, he who is owner of a public service, cannot abdicate for any reason,” he said. “Ethical communication is, in the final analysis, the fruit of an attentive conscience—not one that is superficial—that is always respectful of people, both those about whom the information is given and of the receivers of the message. Each person (in broadcasting) in their respective role and responsibility, is called to be vigilant in order to maintain high ethical standards of communication, and to avoid those things that create much harm: misinformation, defamation and slander.”
He urged the broadcasters to “work well” and to invest trust and hope in their work, so as to communicate these values in their broadcasts. “There is so much need (for trust and hope),” he said.
He also expressed the hope that, “pursuing with determination and perseverance their objectives”, broadcasters “will know how to be at the service of human, cultural and civil growth of society.”
He concluded by wishing participants and their families a good New Year.

Cardinal Angelo Comastri, vicar general for Vatican City, celebrated mass for the attendees prior to the audience.

“Be Vigilant”: Pope Offers Encouragement for Radio and TV Broadcasters

“I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
--Pope Francis
addressing broadcasters from
Italy’s national radio station, RAI
on January 18, 2014

In 2014, Italy’s national radio station, RAI, is marking its 90th anniversary in radio and its 60th anniversary in television. 

For the double anniversary, directors and staff of RAI were welcomed in a special papal audience this morning in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall. 

Pope Francis reminded broadcasters of their responsibility to maintain high ethical standards and to produce media that promotes human growth.  The pope expressed his appreciation for decades of thoughtful programming, noting that through RAI radio and television, Italians have always been able to access the words and images of the Pope and to follow Church events including the Second Vatican Council, papal elections, papal visits in Italy, the Jubilee Year, and the funeral of John Paul II.

Vatican Radio offered a full report:

The Pope said the keyword he wanted to highlight on the occasion of these two anniversaries is “collaboration”, in particular the decades-long collaboration between the RAI and the Vatican’s radio and television broadcasters.
The Pope also acknowledged the broadcaster’s various religious productions over the years and its role in documenting change in Italian society and in unifying Italy both linguistically and culturally.
“Recalling such a rich history of accomplishments also calls us to a renewed sense of responsibility,” he said. “I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
The broadcaster “produces culture and education, offers information and entertainment, which at every time of day, reaches a large number of Italians.”
“It is a responsibility to which, he who is owner of a public service, cannot abdicate for any reason,” he said. “Ethical communication is, in the final analysis, the fruit of an attentive conscience—not one that is superficial—that is always respectful of people, both those about whom the information is given and of the receivers of the message. Each person (in broadcasting) in their respective role and responsibility, is called to be vigilant in order to maintain high ethical standards of communication, and to avoid those things that create much harm: misinformation, defamation and slander.”
He urged the broadcasters to “work well” and to invest trust and hope in their work, so as to communicate these values in their broadcasts. “There is so much need (for trust and hope),” he said.
He also expressed the hope that, “pursuing with determination and perseverance their objectives”, broadcasters “will know how to be at the service of human, cultural and civil growth of society.”
He concluded by wishing participants and their families a good New Year.

Cardinal Angelo Comastri, vicar general for Vatican City, celebrated mass for the attendees prior to the audience.

“Be Vigilant”: Pope Offers Encouragement for Radio and TV Broadcasters

“I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
--Pope Francis
addressing broadcasters from
Italy’s national radio station, RAI
on January 18, 2014

In 2014, Italy’s national radio station, RAI, is marking its 90th anniversary in radio and its 60th anniversary in television. 

For the double anniversary, directors and staff of RAI were welcomed in a special papal audience this morning in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall. 

Pope Francis reminded broadcasters of their responsibility to maintain high ethical standards and to produce media that promotes human growth.  The pope expressed his appreciation for decades of thoughtful programming, noting that through RAI radio and television, Italians have always been able to access the words and images of the Pope and to follow Church events including the Second Vatican Council, papal elections, papal visits in Italy, the Jubilee Year, and the funeral of John Paul II.

Vatican Radio offered a full report:

The Pope said the keyword he wanted to highlight on the occasion of these two anniversaries is “collaboration”, in particular the decades-long collaboration between the RAI and the Vatican’s radio and television broadcasters.
The Pope also acknowledged the broadcaster’s various religious productions over the years and its role in documenting change in Italian society and in unifying Italy both linguistically and culturally.
“Recalling such a rich history of accomplishments also calls us to a renewed sense of responsibility,” he said. “I remind you that your profession, in addition to being informative, is formative; it is a public service, that is, a service for the common good, a service for truth, for goodness, and for beauty.”
The broadcaster “produces culture and education, offers information and entertainment, which at every time of day, reaches a large number of Italians.”
“It is a responsibility to which, he who is owner of a public service, cannot abdicate for any reason,” he said. “Ethical communication is, in the final analysis, the fruit of an attentive conscience—not one that is superficial—that is always respectful of people, both those about whom the information is given and of the receivers of the message. Each person (in broadcasting) in their respective role and responsibility, is called to be vigilant in order to maintain high ethical standards of communication, and to avoid those things that create much harm: misinformation, defamation and slander.”
He urged the broadcasters to “work well” and to invest trust and hope in their work, so as to communicate these values in their broadcasts. “There is so much need (for trust and hope),” he said.
He also expressed the hope that, “pursuing with determination and perseverance their objectives”, broadcasters “will know how to be at the service of human, cultural and civil growth of society.”
He concluded by wishing participants and their families a good New Year.

Cardinal Angelo Comastri, vicar general for Vatican City, celebrated mass for the attendees prior to the audience.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" for January 17

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on January 17

4:00 – Direct to My Desk - Various Topics

5:00 – How to Wolf-Proof Your Kids: A Practical Guide for Keeping Your Kids Catholic
Gary Michuta has long worked in the field of apologetics and evangelism. A few years ago, he gathered his experiences and ideas into a series of talks titled "How to Wolf-Proof Your Kids." Catholic parents around the country were extremely enthusiastic about the talks. Parents frequently approached him after his talks and encouraged him to put the information into book form because their own experiences so closely mirrored what he said. Some of these parents would proceed to share their own heart-breaking stories when their child had been pulled out of the Church. These discussions with parents spurred him to act and the result is the book How to Wolf-Proof Your Kids: A Practical Guide for Keeping Your Kids Catholic.Gary joins us to discuss it and answer your questions.

“Just Married” and Loving It! (Plus, Other Great Resources No Couple Should Be Without!)

Dear Dr. Popcak,  I just wanted to tell you (and your wife) THANK YOU for writing “Just Married.”  My married friends and I are always complaining to each other about the absolute dearth of material for faithful Catholics wanting to date, prepare for marriage, and live marriage in an authentically Catholic way. Basically, we hear two messages: [Read More...]

Bishop Zurek: Concerns About Priests For Life Have Been "Favorably Addressed"

By Kathy Schiffer

Fr. Frank Pavone at the U.S. Supreme Court
In 2011 Bishop Patrick Zurek, bishop of the Diocese of Amarillo, sent a letter to all the bishops of the United States, advising them that he had so many concerns about Priests For Life's $10 million budget that the organization's national director, Fr. Frank Pavone, shouldn't be trusted with donors' money.

For a full year, while an investigation was pending, Father Pavone was restricted to working from a small cell in a Texas convent.  He was unable to continue his travel and speaking schedule on behalf of the unborn.  The high-profile case was sent to the Vatican for review.

Bishop Zurek
Finally, in December 2013, Bishop Zurek sent a letter to the bishops of the United States, informing them that all the concerns he had addressed with regard to the Staten Island-based Priests For Life (PFL) "have been favorably received and addressed by the Congregation for Clergy."

Bishop Zurek is quoted in the Long Island Catholic:
“My concerns included some restructuring of PFL so that it would have juridic personality and become a true ecclesial association. Also included was a request for more adequate and transparent reporting of finances to the competent ecclesiastical authority. Both of these requests have been favorably addressed by the Congregation of Clergy.”
A year ago, in November 2012, the Congregation for Clergy had ruled that since the principal office of Priests For Life is in the Archdiocese of New York, the Archbishop of New York is the competent authority to exercise vigilance over the association.
“I am happy that this process is at an end," Bishop Zurek wrote in his most recent letter, "and I hope and pray that Father Pavone and PFL may now continue its important work in the defense of all human life, especially that of the unborn.”
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