• YouTube
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Podcast

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – October 1, 2013

Talking about the "things that matter most" on October 1

4:00 – 6:00 – The Pope Interview: Take 2
Pope Francis has again causes a sensation with a lengthy interview, telling the Italian daily La Repubblica that he will work toward a Church “that is not just top-down but also horizontal.” The interview—which appeared on the same day the Pope began consulting with the Council of Cardinals about possible Vatican reforms— ranged over the Pope’s hopes for the Church, his concerns about youth unemployment and neglect of the elderly, his favorite saints, and other topics. The interview was conducted by Eugenio Scalfari, the atheist founder of the left-leaning Repubblica. Earlier in September the newspaper had published a long letter from Pope Francis, responding to an editorial by Scalfari. Now, Scalfari reveals, the Pontiff followed up with a phone call, suggesting a meeting. That meeting, which took place last week at the Pope’s apartment in the Casa Sanctae Marthae, furnished the material for the interview. Scalfari opened the conversation by expressing some misgivings that the Pope might try to convert him. The Pope quickly put him at ease. “Proselytism is solemn nonsense,” he said. “We need to get to know each other.” In answer to a leading question about the problems facing the Church today, Pope Francis answered: “The most serious of the evils that afflict the world these days are youth unemployment and the loneliness of the old.” We look at this most recent interview.

Catholic View for Women Begins New Season!






CVFW 2013-1 SmWelcome back to season three of the Catholic View for Women!  Janet, Astrid, and I believe that you will find the topics we cover are spot on in terms of what's happening in our culture and our Church today.  That's because the shows are designed around issues facing you, our viewers.  The shows are also a direct result of ...

Just Married: A Patheos Book Club Interview with Dr. Greg and Lisa Popcak

Deborah Arca of the Patheos Book Club interviewed Lisa and I yesterday on our new book, Just Married:  The Catholic Guide to Surviving and Thriving in the First 5 Years of Marriage (Ave Maria Press).

"I Will Change the Church" – On Super 8 Eve, Reports Tip Interview #2

 
Monday, September 30, 2013
 
Six and a half months into the new Rule of Francis, among other patterns to emerge is that, when the Pope gets excited, he likes to "load the cannon."

One earlier example of this came on 5 July, when – within a matter of hours – Papa Bergoglio released his first encyclical (a work "of four hands" with his predecessor), announced the canonizations of John XXIII and John Paul II and made his first joint public appearance with B16. And now, on the day that he formally set next 27 April for the first sainting of two Popes at once – and with the all-important summit of what's now officially in business as the "Council of Cardinals" opening in the morning – an already full news-cycle will reportedly soon see an added dose of chaos: namely, another interview.

The Pope's second on-the-record conversation to emerge in 11 days, a notice late tonight on the website of Italy's largest daily, La Repubblica, announced the imminent publication of an interview with Francis conducted by the paper's co-founder, the atheist Eugenio Scalfari, long a significant figure of the Italian Left. It's not the first interaction between the two; a July letter Scalfari sent to Francis was replied to by the pontiff in an extensive op-ed for the paper earlier this month.


The news was likewise relayed in a midnight tweet from the daily's editor, Ezio Mauro.
 

For once, an exposé that helps the Vatican bank

  • "Earthquake at the Vatican Bank," a story in the Oct. 3 edition of l'Espresso
|
 
Steamy magazine exposés are rarely good news for the people or institutions featured in them. That's probably especially true for the troubled Vatican bank, which over the years has been the church's premier magnet for conspiracy theories and scandals of every imaginable sort.

On Friday, however, the bank finally caught a break.

There was yet another gossipy piece in an Italian newsmagazine, in this case l'Espresso, featuring ominous storm cloud art, which was full of unnamed sources describing an "earthquake" related to the bank. (The place is technically the "Institute for the Works of Religion," often referred to by the Italian acronym IOR.)

Immediately after it appeared, the piece had phone lines buzzing inside the Vatican, in part because after last summer's leaks scandal, the perception that insiders are spilling the beans to reporters usually means going to Defcon 1.

Yet despite the melodramatic flourishes in the piece, its overall effect is probably to burnish, rather than erode, the bank's new image. 
Explore our print edition, featuring our annual Health & Well Being special section.
That's because the "earthquake" to which the title refers is a growing sense of shock that bank officials aren't just talking about transparency, but actually implementing it – beginning with insisting that Vatican personnel, including those at the very top of the food chain, explain where the money they have parked at the bank comes from and what they're doing with it.

"In the Vatican, the unthinkable is happening," the article reports. "A deadly tightening up has been imposed … in the name of legality and absolute transparency."

For most outsiders, the application of tighter controls probably seems less unthinkable than long overdue. Aside from its checkered historical past, such as the celebrated scandals involving Roberto Calvi and the Banco Ambrosiano in the 1980s, the IOR has recently stumbled through a series of embarrassments:

Read the rest here: http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/once-expos-helps-vatican-bank

After Years of Decline, Catholics See Rise in Number of Future Priests

    
seminary
Faculty and candidates for graduation assemble in the Bruening-Marotta Library of Saint Mary Seminary in Wickliffe, Ohio, on May 8, 2013. (Photo by Renata M. Courey / courtesy Saint Mary Seminary and Graduate School of Theology and Diocese of Cleveland)
After decades of glum trends—fewer priests, fewer parishes—the Catholic Church in the United States has a new statistic to cheer: More men are now enrolled in graduate-level seminaries, the main pipeline to the priesthood, than in nearly two decades.

This year’s tally of 3,694 graduate theology students represents a 16 percent increase since 1995 and a 10 percent jump since 2005, according to Georgetown University’s Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA).

Seminary directors cite more encouragement from bishops and parishes, the draw of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and the social-justice-minded Pope Francis, and a growing sense that the church is past the corrosive impact of the sexual abuse crisis that exploded in 2002.

Ultimately, it was “a calling in my heart,” says Kevin Fox.

He walked away from his electrical engineering degree and a job in his field, working with CT scanners, to enter St. Mary Seminary in Wickliffe, Ohio, in his home diocese, Cleveland, this fall.
“I always had an inkling that I might want to be a priest and my parish priest told me he thought I might be called,” said Fox, 24. “But I put it aside.”

With a fresh degree from Case Western Reserve and his first post-graduation job, Fox soon realized the secular path “wasn’t filling my soul with joy.”

Now, after years of pure science, Fox is immersed in pure theology–and loving it. The challenges of the culture, such as crude jokes from strangers about the abuse crisis, have not dissuaded him.

Read the rest here: http://www.charismanews.com/world/41158-after-years-of-decline-catholics-see-rise-in-number-of-future-priests

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – September 30, 2013

Talking about the "things that matter most" on September 30

4:00 – Kresta Comments – Reza Aslan’s “Five Myths About Jesus”

4:20 – The Testimony and Writing of Elizabeth Ficocelli
Elizabeth Ficocelli is a best-selling, award-winning author of fourteen books for adults and young people, including Seven From Heaven: How Your Family Can Find Healing, Strength and Protection in the Sacraments; Lourdes: Font of Faith, Hope & Charity; Shower of Heavenly Roses: Stories of the Intercession of St. Thérèse of Lisieux; and The Imitation of Christ for Children. She here in Southeast MI today and stops into the studio to talk about her faith journey, her writing, and her passion for the Faith.

5:00 – Kresta Comments – Reza Aslan’s “Five Myths About Jesus”

5:20 – Kresta Comments – “Miss World” Pageant in Bali And The Muslim Reaction

5:40 – Partnering for Catholic Education in Kenya
Two schools - Embul-Bul Catholic Schools and St. Andrew Nkaimurunya are both located in the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya where the unemployment rate is 40%, half of the population lives below the poverty line, life expectancy is just 63 years and infant mortality rate is 43 deaths  for every 1,000 births. Though Kenya offers free public education, in reality too few public schools exist — most are full and turn children away. They also turn away children who are academically behind for the ironic reason that they were previously unable to attend school. But Embul-Bul and St. Andrew welcome children off the streets and provide them with a quality education, daily nutritious lunches and a firm grounding in Catholic moral values. Jim Cavnar of Cross Catholic International Outreach is here to talk about their partnership with Ave Maria Radio to provide scholarships for Kenyan children.

Are We Obsessed?

     
siege

A few passages from Pope Francis’ famous interview published in America have unsettled some people for many reasons. My reason for being unsettled is that it would not be a complete distortion to say that I have been “obsessed” with the issues of abortion, contraception, and homosexuality for nearly all of my professional life. I prefer the terms “dedicated” or “committed,” of course, but whatever word is appropriate, I have long thought that helping people understand why abortion, contraception, and homosexual acts are not in accord with God’s plans for human happiness is a very effective way of drawing people closer to the Lord and to the Church, and thus, more or less, most of my adult life, I have been evangelizing in this way.

Enough about me. Let me talk about the legions of pro-lifers who run pregnancy help centers (which outnumber abortion clinics), of those who host pro-life websites and give pro-life talks, of those who try to get pro-life politicians elected, of those who do the hard work of trying to find jobs, housing, and other kinds of support for single mothers, of those who provide healing ministries to women who have had abortions, such as Rachel Weeping. Let me talk about teachers of Natural Family Planning and the Theology of the Body and abstinence educators. Let me talk about those who work for and promote Courage, a compassionate ministry to those who experience same sex attraction and about those who against strangely strong odds make the case against same sex “marriages.” Let me talk about those who use Facebook, blogs, and comments on blogs to try to dialogue with those who reject and even despise Church teaching and those who defend it.

I know these people and most of them radiate the love for Christ and the Church that the Holy Father desires. They sacrifice their time, talent, and energy because they love Christ and those who hate Christ and those who don’t know Christ. Undoubtedly some pro-lifers and some opponents of contraception and some who crusade against the widespread acceptance of homosexuality are angry people ready to condemn others as unredeemable sinners, but I suspect they are few and far between in the US at least. Although I have seen rare postings on the internet, written by putative Christians that are very unchristian, I have not met any such individuals in “real life.”

In fact, I don’t think the Holy Father was speaking about my friends, when he states:

We cannot insist only on issues related to abortion, gay marriage and the use of contraceptive methods. This is not possible. I have not spoken much about these things, and I was reprimanded for that. But when we speak about these issues, we have to talk about them in a context.

My friends definitely talk about these issues “in context,” in fact in many contexts. Again, their reason for boldly and sacrificially and ardently addressing these issues is precisely because they love Christ and the Church and want others to do so. They are trying to save people, to save them from ignorance about Church teaching, to save them from serious sin, to save them from missing out on the great joys of accepting Christ as their savior and the Church as their home. And—praise God—sometimes they succeed. In fact, my own reversion to the Church was greatly facilitated by an anti-Catholic professor who patiently argued with students that truth exists. It pained him that many of his students converted to Catholicism, once they came to accept that truth exists, and even moral truths that require most students to change their behavior radically.

Do read the rest at: http://www.firstthings.com/onthesquare/2013/09/are-we-obsessed

Marriage Hack: Improve your Marriage (and your Life) in 3 Easy Steps

On this feast of St. Jerome, who is almost as well-known for his temper as for his work translating the bible, we thought we’d share some tips for negotiating marital arguments. This video reveals a surprisingly simple, empirically-validated technique that anyone can use to improve their marriage and, surprisingly, general life satisfaction in 3 easy [Read More...]

BREAKING: Two Popes to Be Canonized on Divine Mercy Sunday

By Kathy Schiffer, Ave Maria Radio
It’s official!  Pope Francis has just announced that two former popes, Blessed John Paul II and Blessed John XXIII, will be made saints on April 27, 2014—Divine Mercy Sunday.

BLESSED POPE JOHN XXIII, born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, was affectionately known as the “Good Pope” (in Italian, “il Papa Buono”).  He led the Catholic Church from October 1958 to his death in 1963.
Pope John XXIII was 77 years old when elected to the papacy, and some first thought that he would be a “caretaker pope”—simply filling the Chair for a few years, but not really reshaping the Church during what was expected to be a short papacy.  Instead, he convened the historic Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). His feast day is not the day of his death, as is traditional, but rather the anniversary of the opening of the first session of Vatican II:  October 11.




BLESSED POPE JOHN PAUL II, born Karol Józef Wojtyła, was the second longest-serving pope in history, leading the Catholic Church from October 1978 until his death in 2005.
He is considered one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century, recognized for his efforts to end Communist rule in his native Poland and all of Europe.  During his pontificate, he strengthened the Catholic Church’s relations with other religions including Judaism, Islam, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion.
During his long tenure, Pope John Paul II published many encyclicals pertaining to the role of the Church in the modern world, and promoted the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the new Code of Canon Law.  He defended Church teachings opposing contraception and the ordination of women, and he supported the reforms initiated during Vatican II.

A surprise, for your listening pleasure:  Here is a rendition of the Ave Maria sung by Karol Wojtyla, the future Pope John Paul II, in 1976.

Page 39 of 67« First...102030...3738394041...5060...Last »
YouTube Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Podcast