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The Antidote to DIY Catholicism (Part II of Guest Blog by Dave McClow, LMFT, LCSW)

(Read Part One Here) The Catechism and Fatherhood What gets in the way of knowing this love deeply?  The Catechism of the Catholic Church knows the power of parents.  In the section on the Our Father, it states: 2779 Before we make our own this first exclamation of the Lord’s Prayer, we must humbly cleanse [Read More...]

Why Johnny Can’t Pray– Why Catholic Religious Education is Doomed to Fail.

Over at Egregious Twaddle, my fellow Patheosi, Joanne McPortland, has a provocative post about What’s Really Wrong with Catholic Religious Education?  You should go read it.  Chances are, it will do two things.  First, I suspect,  it will piss you off.  Then, I suspect, you’ll find yourself agreeing with it.  At least, that’s what happened [Read More...]

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 4

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 4, 2014
Live from Ave Maria, FL
In 1965, the U. S. Supreme Court, in the case of Griswold v. Connecticut, ruled unconstitutional a 1879 Connecticut statute that outlawed the use of contraception. Although constitutional law scholars often discuss the case in terms of its logic and holding, they rarely do so with an eye toward the statutory language that the Court held was in violation of the Constitution. For this reason, these scholars, not to mention their students and their readers, often miss the underlying rationale of the decision, which may shed light on contemporary legal disputes about the same subject matter. Frank Beckwithhelps us unfold that rationale.

4:20 – Do All Religions Deserve Respect?
Do All Religions Deserve Respect? This is a question recently posed by Joseph Trabbic, a Philosophy at Ave Maria University. He says a sound argument for religious freedom would not claim that all religions have a right to equal respect. Any argument that included a similar premise would be unsound and rightly ridiculed. Let us call this kind of argument for religious freedom a “universalist argument” since it says that all religions should be treated equally. Although a universalist argument for religious freedom might in many situations appear expedient, when truth is subordinated to apologetics the long-term effects (and often the short-term ones) can be quite harmful. But would any Catholic be tempted to make a universalist argument for religious freedom? He is here to answer that question and present his case.
5:00 – Kresta Comments
5:20 – Fighting Mad: Practical Solutions for Conquering Anger

How do you deal with anger and its emotional buddies? Parents, children, spouses, siblings, coworkers, even friends; we all struggle with situations where we experience feelings of anger. Dr. Ray Guarendi is here to cut through psychobabble to present a realistic picture of anger and other emotional issues, and then offers practical solutions for overcoming them. He presents a basic understanding of anger and clears up common misconceptions, and then focuses on different aspects of anger. 

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 4

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 4, 2014
Live from Ave Maria, FL
In 1965, the U. S. Supreme Court, in the case of Griswold v. Connecticut, ruled unconstitutional a 1879 Connecticut statute that outlawed the use of contraception. Although constitutional law scholars often discuss the case in terms of its logic and holding, they rarely do so with an eye toward the statutory language that the Court held was in violation of the Constitution. For this reason, these scholars, not to mention their students and their readers, often miss the underlying rationale of the decision, which may shed light on contemporary legal disputes about the same subject matter. Frank Beckwithhelps us unfold that rationale.

4:20 – Do All Religions Deserve Respect?
Do All Religions Deserve Respect? This is a question recently posed by Joseph Trabbic, a Philosophy at Ave Maria University. He says a sound argument for religious freedom would not claim that all religions have a right to equal respect. Any argument that included a similar premise would be unsound and rightly ridiculed. Let us call this kind of argument for religious freedom a “universalist argument” since it says that all religions should be treated equally. Although a universalist argument for religious freedom might in many situations appear expedient, when truth is subordinated to apologetics the long-term effects (and often the short-term ones) can be quite harmful. But would any Catholic be tempted to make a universalist argument for religious freedom? He is here to answer that question and present his case.
5:00 – Kresta Comments
5:20 – Fighting Mad: Practical Solutions for Conquering Anger

How do you deal with anger and its emotional buddies? Parents, children, spouses, siblings, coworkers, even friends; we all struggle with situations where we experience feelings of anger. Dr. Ray Guarendi is here to cut through psychobabble to present a realistic picture of anger and other emotional issues, and then offers practical solutions for overcoming them. He presents a basic understanding of anger and clears up common misconceptions, and then focuses on different aspects of anger. 

Are Your a Faithful Do It Yourself (DIY) Catholic? –Part 1 (Guest blog by Dave McClow, MA., LISW, LMFT)

When it comes to home improvement, there have always been do-it-yourselfers (DIYers).  And if you’re like me, that means it takes three times as long to complete the project than you expected, three to four more trips to the hardware or big box store than you planned, and a project or two that doesn’t quite [Read More...]

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 3

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 3, 2014
Live from the Ave Maria School of Law
4:00 – Guttmacher Study Shows Pro-Life Success in Swing States
Earlier this month, the Guttmacher Institute released their 2013 state-policy review. The report indicates that pro-lifers continue to make very good legislative progress at the state level. In 2013, 70 state-level pro-life measures were enacted — making 2013 the second most productive year on record. The report specifically cites Texas, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Arkansas as being especially active in passing pro-life laws. Overall, according to Guttmacher, there have been more pro-life laws passed between 2011 and 2013 than in the entire previous decade. Pro-life writer Michael New is here to analyze why and the impact of these numbers.
4:20 – Kresta Comments: The Super Bowl / Phillip Seymour Hoffman / Pro-Life Impact and More
5:00 – Continuing to Follow the Ins and Outs of the Cases Against the HHS Mandate
As of last week, more than 50 briefs were filed in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of Hobby Lobby Stores and the Green family, supporting their challenge to the HHS mandate. That case is one that the Supreme Court will hear in its next session, but many more challenges continue to wind their way through the courts. We talk to Gene Milhizer of the Ave Maria Law School.
5:20 – The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention. But as Edward Feser argues in The Last Superstition, in fact there is not, and never has been, any war between science and religion at all. There has instead been a conflict between two entirely philosophical conceptions of the natural order. He joins us to make his case.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 3

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 3, 2014
Live from the Ave Maria School of Law
4:00 – Guttmacher Study Shows Pro-Life Success in Swing States
Earlier this month, the Guttmacher Institute released their 2013 state-policy review. The report indicates that pro-lifers continue to make very good legislative progress at the state level. In 2013, 70 state-level pro-life measures were enacted — making 2013 the second most productive year on record. The report specifically cites Texas, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Arkansas as being especially active in passing pro-life laws. Overall, according to Guttmacher, there have been more pro-life laws passed between 2011 and 2013 than in the entire previous decade. Pro-life writer Michael New is here to analyze why and the impact of these numbers.
4:20 – Kresta Comments: The Super Bowl / Phillip Seymour Hoffman / Pro-Life Impact and More
5:00 – Continuing to Follow the Ins and Outs of the Cases Against the HHS Mandate
As of last week, more than 50 briefs were filed in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of Hobby Lobby Stores and the Green family, supporting their challenge to the HHS mandate. That case is one that the Supreme Court will hear in its next session, but many more challenges continue to wind their way through the courts. We talk to Gene Milhizer of the Ave Maria Law School.
5:20 – The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention. But as Edward Feser argues in The Last Superstition, in fact there is not, and never has been, any war between science and religion at all. There has instead been a conflict between two entirely philosophical conceptions of the natural order. He joins us to make his case.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 3

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 3, 2014
Live from the Ave Maria School of Law
4:00 – Guttmacher Study Shows Pro-Life Success in Swing States
Earlier this month, the Guttmacher Institute released their 2013 state-policy review. The report indicates that pro-lifers continue to make very good legislative progress at the state level. In 2013, 70 state-level pro-life measures were enacted — making 2013 the second most productive year on record. The report specifically cites Texas, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Arkansas as being especially active in passing pro-life laws. Overall, according to Guttmacher, there have been more pro-life laws passed between 2011 and 2013 than in the entire previous decade. Pro-life writer Michael New is here to analyze why and the impact of these numbers.
4:20 – Kresta Comments: The Super Bowl / Phillip Seymour Hoffman / Pro-Life Impact and More
5:00 – Continuing to Follow the Ins and Outs of the Cases Against the HHS Mandate
As of last week, more than 50 briefs were filed in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of Hobby Lobby Stores and the Green family, supporting their challenge to the HHS mandate. That case is one that the Supreme Court will hear in its next session, but many more challenges continue to wind their way through the courts. We talk to Gene Milhizer of the Ave Maria Law School.
5:20 – The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention. But as Edward Feser argues in The Last Superstition, in fact there is not, and never has been, any war between science and religion at all. There has instead been a conflict between two entirely philosophical conceptions of the natural order. He joins us to make his case.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 3

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 3, 2014
Live from the Ave Maria School of Law
4:00 – Guttmacher Study Shows Pro-Life Success in Swing States
Earlier this month, the Guttmacher Institute released their 2013 state-policy review. The report indicates that pro-lifers continue to make very good legislative progress at the state level. In 2013, 70 state-level pro-life measures were enacted — making 2013 the second most productive year on record. The report specifically cites Texas, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Arkansas as being especially active in passing pro-life laws. Overall, according to Guttmacher, there have been more pro-life laws passed between 2011 and 2013 than in the entire previous decade. Pro-life writer Michael New is here to analyze why and the impact of these numbers.
4:20 – Kresta Comments: The Super Bowl / Phillip Seymour Hoffman / Pro-Life Impact and More
5:00 – Continuing to Follow the Ins and Outs of the Cases Against the HHS Mandate
As of last week, more than 50 briefs were filed in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of Hobby Lobby Stores and the Green family, supporting their challenge to the HHS mandate. That case is one that the Supreme Court will hear in its next session, but many more challenges continue to wind their way through the courts. We talk to Gene Milhizer of the Ave Maria Law School.
5:20 – The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention. But as Edward Feser argues in The Last Superstition, in fact there is not, and never has been, any war between science and religion at all. There has instead been a conflict between two entirely philosophical conceptions of the natural order. He joins us to make his case.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Feb. 3

Talking About the “Things That Matter Most” on February 3, 2014
Live from the Ave Maria School of Law
4:00 – Guttmacher Study Shows Pro-Life Success in Swing States
Earlier this month, the Guttmacher Institute released their 2013 state-policy review. The report indicates that pro-lifers continue to make very good legislative progress at the state level. In 2013, 70 state-level pro-life measures were enacted — making 2013 the second most productive year on record. The report specifically cites Texas, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Arkansas as being especially active in passing pro-life laws. Overall, according to Guttmacher, there have been more pro-life laws passed between 2011 and 2013 than in the entire previous decade. Pro-life writer Michael New is here to analyze why and the impact of these numbers.
4:20 – Kresta Comments: The Super Bowl / Phillip Seymour Hoffman / Pro-Life Impact and More
5:00 – Continuing to Follow the Ins and Outs of the Cases Against the HHS Mandate
As of last week, more than 50 briefs were filed in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of Hobby Lobby Stores and the Green family, supporting their challenge to the HHS mandate. That case is one that the Supreme Court will hear in its next session, but many more challenges continue to wind their way through the courts. We talk to Gene Milhizer of the Ave Maria Law School.
5:20 – The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion, that religion has been steadily losing that war, and that at this point in human history a completely secular scientific account of the world has been worked out in such thorough and convincing detail that there is no longer any reason why a rational and educated person should find the claims of any religion the least bit worthy of attention. But as Edward Feser argues in The Last Superstition, in fact there is not, and never has been, any war between science and religion at all. There has instead been a conflict between two entirely philosophical conceptions of the natural order. He joins us to make his case.

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