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Mob of topless pro-choice feminists attacks praying men

A video of lesbian violence against Christians goes viral, despite a media blackout
Yelling, topless women spray-painting men’s crotches. Protestors spitting in faces. Lesbians performing lewd acts and shoving their bare breasts on praying men. A mob of thousands of angry women dancing around a burning effigy of the pope. No, it’s not newsreel footage from Nazi Germany. It’s present day Argentina. Haven’t heard about it? That’s because the mainstream media has been dead silent on an event that should have been front page news across the globe. It was caught on tape, however, and watchers of the shocking, now viral video are mostly calling it “satanic” and noting it certainly would have been big news if Christians had assaulted pro-choicers and lesbians.
An escalating annual event
An escalating annual event Canada’s pro-life LifeSiteNews broke the story last week. It took place in San Juan, a city of 500,000 in western Argentina, on Sunday, November 24th. Seventeen thousand women attended the 28th annual National Meeting of Women, a feminist conference to discuss violence, gender issues and abortion rights. Then, as has become a custom since at least 2008 following the conference, many participants took to the streets to rampage and attack the local churches. 
Only 500 feminists tried to storm a cathedral in Podomos, Argentina following last year’s National Women’s Conference. At 7,000 this year, the violence is growing. Knowing what was coming, some 1,500 faithful turned out to defend San Juan’s cathedral from invasion and damage. Men linked arms in a ring outside, while another 700 people prayed inside. A priest led exorcism prayers before the rioting protestors turned up. The video shows topless women gyrating in lesbian sex acts, drawing Nazi symbols on the men’s faces, molesting them, spitting and chanting: “To the Roman Catholic Apostolic Church, who wants to get between our sheets, we say that we want to be whores, transvestites and lesbians. Legal abortion in every hospital.” Throughout the entire clip, the men stand like a stone wall and quietly pray the rosary. Not one demonstrator got inside.

The ‘new evangelism’ at work 

The video, posted by pro-life websites, has now been viewed at least 400,000 times and has elicited thousands of comments, many of them noting the “satanic” behavior of the abortion activists, and commending the men for their imperturbable restraint.

In a remarkable interview with LifeSiteNews, one of the men who defended San Juan’s cathedral, Oscar Campillay, told how during the two-hour ordeal he felt there “was something inhuman there, almost diabolic, that made one shudder.” But, he said, he decided to look in the eyes of a girl whose face was covered while she was assaulting him and to pray for her. “There was an instant in which our eyes met and we each held our gaze firmly,” he said. “Suddenly she became calm and quiet; slowly she uncovered her face and looked at me, and withdrew in silence away from the crowd.”

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Dec. 11, 2013

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on December 11
4:00 – Evangelii Gaudium: Pope Francis the Revolutionary
According to George Weigel, the first nine months of the pontificate of Pope Francis have often resembled a gigantic Rorschach test in which various commentators inside and outside the Catholic Church have “seen” their dreams and fears realized. Alas, what has been “seen” has often had little to do with the record of Jorge Mario Bergoglio as priest and bishop or with his most consequential decisions as Pope. Those projections reached fever pitch with the publication on Tuesday of Francis’ first apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium” (The Joy of the Gospel), which was celebrated, or lamented, as if it were an Occupy Whatever position paper for a G-8 summit. Instead, the papal document should be read and appreciated for what it manifestly is: a clarion call for a decisive shift in the Catholic Church’s self-understanding, in full continuity with the teaching of the Second Vatican Council, Paul VI, John Paul II and Benedict XVI. George joins us to make his case.
4:20 – Former Ambassadors: Obama’s call to close Vatican embassy is ‘slap in the face’ to Roman Catholics
Plans to move the U.S. embassy to the Vatican onto the grounds of the larger American embassy to Italy, though in a separate building and with a distinct entrance, are drawing fire from five former American envoys despite the tacit consent of the Vatican itself. Justified primarily on the grounds of enhanced security, the move is drawing fire from former Vatican Ambassadors James Nicholson, Francis Rooney, Mary Ann Glendon, Raymond Flynn, and Thomas Melady. Ambassador Flynn is here to explain his objections.
4:30 – U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Landmark Hobby Lobby Case
The U.S. Supreme Court last week agreed to take up two challenges to the HHS Mandate, one of which is Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., a landmark case addressing the Constitutionally guaranteed rights of business owners to operate their family companies without violating their deeply held religious convictions. We talk to Lori Windham, an attorney with the Beckett Fund which filed this case.
4:40 – The Philosophy of “The Hunger Games”
With the amazing success of the film The Hunger Games: The Girl on Fire over the last week, we talk about the Philosophy of the books – and now the movies. Katniss Everdeen is “the girl who was on fire,” but she is also the girl who made us think, dream, question authority, and rebel. The post-apocalyptic world of Panem’s twelve districts is a divided society on the brink of war and struggling to survive, while the Capitol lives in the lap of luxury and pure contentment. At every turn in the Hunger Games trilogy, Katniss, Peeta, Gale, and their many allies wrestle with harrowing choices and ethical dilemmas that push them to the brink. Co-editor of The Hunger Games and Philosophy, George Dunn, joins us.
5:00 – Kresta Comments: Pope Francis Named TIME Magazine “Person of the Year. Why?
5:40 – Being Single During the Christmas Season

Christmas can often be a difficult for singles. It can feel very lonely when it feels like everyone around you is dating or married. How do you deal with that? At Christmas Eve dinner, there is always that Aunt who asks: “when are you going to get married already?” How can you stay joyful at Christmas when you are single? Mary Beth Bonacci is here to answer these questions and more.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – December 9, 2013

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on December 9
4:00 – Study of 36 Chinese Abortion-Breast Cancer Studies a “Game Changer”
A systematic review and meta-analysis of 36 Chinese studies by Dr. Yubei Huang and his colleagues in the prestigious journal, Cancer Causes Control, last week reported a significant 44% increased breast cancer risk among women with at least one induced abortion, compared to women without induced abortions.  Huang’s team cited and supports a 1996 review and meta-analysis, led by Joel Brind, Ph.D. and colleagues at Penn State, who found a 30% risk elevation for women with any history of induced abortions. We talk to Dr. Brind about his long-time fight to get the medical community to recognize the abortion – breast cancer link.
4:20 – More of the Holy Spirit: How to Keep the Fire Burning in Our Hearts
In the last forty years, many Catholics have experienced an outpouring of the Holy Spirit in their lives that resulted in a new passion for God and a zeal for spreading the gospel. In addition to a newfound love of prayer, Scripture, and the Eucharist, many have been blessed with the supernatural gifts of the Holy Spirit, such as tongues and healing. Yet as the years go by, many often experience a waning of the gifts of the Spirit as well as a luke-warmness creeping into their lives. What can we do to keep that fire for God, which may have been ignited many years ago, burning brightly in our hearts? Sr. Ann Shields is here to tell us.

5:00 – Kresta Comments

The Feast of the Immaculate Conception / The Finalists for
TIME Magazine “Person of the Year” / Remembering Nelson Mandela / The Most Post-Christian Cities

A New Jesuit Saint Before Christmas

Blessed Peter Faber, S.J.
By Kathy Schiffer
Any day now, Pope Francis is expected to issue a papal bull decreeing that Peter Faber, companion of St. Ignatius and co-founder of the Society of Jesus, is a saint.  No date for the canonization has been announced; but it is predicted that it will occur before Christmas.
The process for the canonization, according to the Italian Catholic newspaper Avvenire, will be what is called “equivalent canonization”—that is, a canonization when the Pope omits the customary judicial process and ceremonies involved, and simply decrees that the servant of God should be venerated in the Universal Church.  Equivalent canonization is an appropriate process for cases in which the holy person has, over a long period of time, been the object of veneration; when his or her heroic virtues (or martyrdom) and miracles are related by reliable historians; and when the fame of his miraculous intercession is uninterrupted.
According to Italian journalist Andrea Tornielli, writing in La Stampa:

The process for his cause in the Congregation for the Causes of Saints is complete and now all that remains is for Francis to issue the Bull of Canonization that will proclaim the first companion of St. Ignatius a saint, extending the cult of the soon-to-be-saint to the Universal Church.

Faber was born in the Upper Savoy region of France in 1506 and died in Rome in 1547 just a few weeks before he was due to attend the Council of Trent. He was beatified in September 1872 with a Papal Rescript issued by the Sacred Congregation of Rites and ratified by the Society of Jesus. Now Francis is extending the liturgical cult to the Universal Church.

Faber’s canonization is of particular interest because the Jesuit is, according to Tornielli, “a model of spirituality and priestly life for the current successor of Peter.  At the same time, he is an important reference point for understanding the Pope’s leadership style.”
Faber lived in the sixteenth century, in a time when the unity of the Church was being threatened. He mostly avoided the doctrinal disputes which were going on around him, focusing instead on reform of the Church, becoming a pioneer of ecumenism.
Pope Francis spoke about Faber in his famous interview with Fr. Antonio Spadaro for the Jesuit journal Civiltà Cattolica, revealing some key aspects of the priest as a figure:

“[His] dialogue with all, even the most remote and even with his opponents; his simple piety, a certain naïveté perhaps, his being available straightaway, his careful interior discernment, the fact that he was a man capable of great and strong decisions but also capable of being so gentle and loving.”

USCCB President Archbishop Kurtz Applauds Pope’s Decision to Establish Commission for Protection of Minors

Every effort must be made to protect children
Broad-based approach to problem is welcome
U.S. bishops have made great strides but still more to be done
December 5, 2013
WASHINGTON—Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, welcomed the decision of Pope Francis to establish a commission on the protection of minors. The move was urged by the Council of Cardinals, an advisory group to the pope that met at the Vatican, December 3-5. Archbishop Kurtz praised the effort in a December 5 statement.
The statement follows.
The decision of Pope Francis to establish a commission for the protection of minors is a most welcome initiative. Abuse of minors is a sin and a crime, and every step must be taken to eradicate this blight. Such abuse is especially grave when committed by anyone in ministry in our Church.
The problem of sexual abuse of minors exists throughout society and every effort must be made to protect children, particularly within the Church.
The announcement of this initiative reflects a broad-based approach that considers changes in Vatican procedures in dealing with clerics accused of abuse, seminary training for future priests, and other pastoral efforts to address this horrific problem. This international effort is particularly welcome as we have come to learn that this tragedy affects many, if not all, parts of the world.
As president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, I promise full cooperation of the U.S. bishops with this commission and look forward to more information on its implementation. In the United States, we have learned of the importance of background checks, education of children and adults on child safety, the swift removal of offenders, and the need for the Church and civil authorities to work together. While these efforts have resulted in a dramatic reduction in abuse cases, much work remains to be done.
Our prayers are with Pope Francis and this commission, and we are grateful for this effort.
December 5, 2013
#####

Texas School Bans Christmas Trees, As Well As the Colors Red and Green

An elementary school in Frisco, Texas is planning a “winter” party with the halls decked out in… purple?
Nichols Elementary School will not have a Christmas tree, and boys and girls will not be permitted to make any reference to Christmas.  Also banned are the colors red and green.
According to Todd Starnes writing at Fox News, Texas State Representative Pat Fallon, who introduced a successful bill in the Texas Legislature last year titled the “Merry Christmas Bill”, was alerted to the new school policy by an angry parent.   Fallon said:

“When Gov. Perry signed ‘The Merry Christmas Bill,’ clearly that didn’t solve the issue.  The battle rages on. It’s distressing.”

The school countered, saying that they had been unaware of the notice to parents and the policy, and that in fact, students could mention Christmas whenever they wished.  Nonetheless, the policy remains in place.
Representative Fallon insists that despite his clarification regarding Texas law, the school-imposed ban remains in place.  The superintendent of schools is allowing principals to set their own policies regarding celebrations during the holiday season.  “That leads,” Fallon says, “to confusion, misinterpretation and flaunting of the law.”
The school principal has explained in an email to a concerned parent that they don’t want to offend any families [who might not celebrate the Christmas holiday], since each family contributes money to the school. 
Fallon has directed a letter to each school official in the district, reminding them that

“Texas law clearly permits Christmas-themed celebrations, events and displays,” Fallon wrote. “The district may also display scenes or symbols with traditional winter holidays (e.g. nativity scenes, Christmas trees, menorahs, etc.)”

To date, there has been no change in the school district’s policy. 
Read the rest of Todd Starnes’ report here.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – Dec. 5, 2013

Talking about the “things that matter most” on December 5

4:00 – Pope Francis: Why He Leads the Way He Leads
From choosing to live in a simple apartment instead of the papal palace to washing the feet of men and women in a youth detention center, Pope Francis’s actions contradict behaviors expected of a modern leader. Chris Lowney, a former Jesuit seminarian turned Managing Director for JP Morgan & Co., is here to show how the pope’s words and deeds reveal spiritual principles that have prepared him to lead the Church and influence our world—a rapidly-changing world that requires leaders who value the human need for love, inspiration, and meaning. Drawing on interviews with people who knew him as Father Jorge Bergoglio, SJ, Lowney challenges assumptions about what it takes to be a great leader. In so doing, he reveals the “other-centered” leadership style of a man whose passion is to be with people rather than set apart.
5:00 – How to Share Your Faith with Anyone: A Practical Manual of Catholic Evangelization

Recent popes have challenged all Catholics to participate in the New Evangelization. But most Catholics feel ill-equipped to take up the challenge. Terry Barber, founder of St. Joseph Communications, has written a practical guide that takes much of the pain and uncertainty out of sharing one’s faith. Based on Barber’s decades of personal experience as an effective evangelist and masterful communicator, and drawing on the perceptions, examples, and lessons of other great evangelists and apologists, How to Share Your Faith with Anyone informs, entertains, and inspires would-be, as well as, seasoned evangelists and teachers. Terry is here to discuss it.

Pope Francis Establishes New Commission to Combat Child Abuse

By Kathy Schiffer
This morning at the Vatican, it was announced that Pope Francis will set up a child protection commission to combat child abuse. 
Boston’s Cardinal Sean O’Malley, who is in Rome to attend the Council of Cardinals meeting at the Vatican, told reporters that the commission will survey child protection programs and work with bishops and religious. 
Among the commission’s responsibilities will be reviewing existing guidelines, priestly formation programs, codes of conduct, and procedures for screening candidates for the priesthood.  
The commission will also focus on supporting victims of abuse, will issue recommendations regarding how the Church can best cooperate with civil authorities, and will advise the Pope on prevention policies and pastoral outreach for the victims. 
The commission will include both clergy and lay people.

The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith will retain responsibility for investigating and trying accused priests.

Today on "Kresta in the Afternoon" – December 4, 2013

Talking about the “Things That Matter Most” on December 4
4:00 – 2014 Catholic Almanac
It’s the absolute best source for trustworthy, accurate, up-to-date information. Our Sunday Visitor’s Catholic Almanac remains the only annual, comprehensive guide to the Catholic Church. Published annually since 1904, this compendium of information is THE authoritative source for all your most up-to-date facts on the Catholic Church. With thousands of intriguing facts and essential details on a wide range of Catholic subjects, this almanac is completely updated every year and packed with topics relevant for researchers, homilists, writers, media professionals, students, parents, librarians, and teachers. We talk to Almanac editor Matthew Bunson.
5:00 – Contraception and Catholicism: What the Church Teaches and Why

Catholic teaching on contraception…a hard pill to swallow? Despite the Catholic Church’s clear opposition to contraception, many individuals, including Catholics, consider the Church’s stance misogynistic and outdated. In perspective of the prevailing ideologies of today’s mainstream society-a morality dictated by feeling, the assumed inevitability of extramarital sexual activity as necessary for human fulfillment, and the unconsidered idea that contraception is a magic cure for unwanted pregnancy and disease-the Church’s teaching on contraception may surely seem like a hard pill to swallow. But really, it is not. Author Angela Franks, PhD, an experienced pro-life speaker and educator, discovered this truth herself. After questioning the Church’s stance as a young Catholic, she realized that the Church was not forcing an old-fashioned view on our intimate relationships. Rather, the Church was aligning to the reality already present in our biology. She is here to present a comprehensive look at the Church’s view on the meaning and purpose of sex as love and life, unity and procreation. She equips you with the information that you need to understand, adopt, and/or teach the Church’s position on contraception. 

Syrian Nuns Kidnapped; Pope Francis Calls for Prayer

By Kathy Schiffer

Monastery of St. Tecla
Pope Francis, at the end of his General Audience on Wednesday, December 4, called on everyone to pray for a group of Syrian nuns who were kidnapped from the Monastery of Saint Tecla, a Greek Orthodox monastery near the ancient Christian town of Ma’lula, about 35 miles north of Damascus. 

The Holy Father said,

“Now I would like to invite everyone to pray for the religious sisters of the Greek Orthodox Monastery of Saint Tecla in Ma’lula, in Syria, who, two days ago, were taken away by force by armed men.  Let us pray for these sisters, and for all those who have been kidnapped on account of the on-going conflict. Let us continue to pray and to work for peace.”

Pope Francis then led the pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square in praying the Hail Mary, encouraging them to have confidence in Mary and invoking the Blessed Mother as “Queen of Peace.”

According to media reports, the religious superior and four other sisters were kidnapped during the night by armed men who took them to nearby Yabrud.  The government’s Sana news agency speculated that the kidnapping was the work of the Al Nusra Front, which the U.S. State Department defines as a terrorist organization linked to al-Qaida.

Chaldean Bishop Antoine Audo of Aleppo, said that Christians feel more threatened now because the kidnapping has brought the war “to a sacred Christian place, one where for centuries nothing like this has happened.”  
Chaldean Bishop Antoine Audo
Bishop Audo told Vatican Radio,
“Maaloula is an important symbol not only for Christians, but also for Muslims in Syria and throughout the Middle East, because it is known that people there still speak the Aramaic dialect, the language of Christ.”
Bishop Audo said the church in Syria does not want to say this is a war against Christians, because they want to be a presence for reconciliation and coexistence.  He added, “That is our vocation. We don’t want to create provocations with the Muslims.”

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