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Order of Malta's Minute with the Catechism

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Jesus Always Answers our Prayer

  • Program #: 237
  • Description: Does Jesus always answer our prayers? The Catholic Catechism says yes, Jesus always answers prayers offered in faith and quotes Our Lord who said, “Your faith has made you well. Go in peace.” The Catechism cites three examples where Jesus reacts to three different kinds of prayer. The prayer of faith is expressed by the leper, the Canaanite woman and the Good Thief. The prayer of petition is exhibited in the actions of the bearers of the paralyzed man and the Hemorrhaging woman who is healed by merely touching Jesus’ cloak. Finally, urgent prayer is heard from the lips of the blind men. “Have mercy on us, Son of David.”This is remembered today as the “Jesus prayer” - “Lord, Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.” St. Augustine parses this prayer thusly: Jesus prays for us as our priest. In us as our head, and is prayed TO by us as our God. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Prayer and the Theological Virtues

  • Program #: 236
  • Description: How do the three theological virtues- faith, hope and charity fit into our prayer? The Catholic Catechism says “We enter into prayer as we enter into liturgy through the narrow gate of faith. We seek and desire the face of the Lord. It is his word we wish to hear and keep.” The Holy Spirit instructs us to celebrate the liturgy in expectation of Jesus’ return and teaches us to pray in hope. Hope is nourished in us by the prayer of the Church and personal prayer. The Psalms, especially through their concrete and varied language teach us to fix our hope in God. Love is poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit. Prayer, formed by the liturgical life draws everything into Christ’s love for us which enables us to respond to Him by loving as He loved us. Love is the source of prayer. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Blessing and Adoration

  • Program #: 235
  • Description: When we speak of blessing in prayer, what exactly do we mean? The Catholic Catechism defines blessing as a basic movement of Christian prayer; an encounter between God and man. God’s gift and man’s acceptance of that gift are united in dialogue with each other. God blesses and the human heart can respond to bless the One who is the source of every blessing. The Catechism states that two fundamental forms express this movement. Human prayer ascends in the Holy Spirit through Christ to the Father and it implores the grace of the Holy Spirit which descends through Christ from the Father. Adoration, says the Catechism, is man’s first attitude, acknowledging that he is a creature before his Creator. It exalts the God who made us and the almighty power of the Savior who sets us free from evil. It is the homage of the spirit to the King of Glory. This is Peggy Stanton and this, etc.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Prayer in the Early Church

  • Program #: 234
  • Description: How did the first community of believers in Jerusalem pray? The Catholic Catechism tells us that as Christ’s disciples were gathered together on the first Pentecost, the Spirit of the Promise was poured out on them. They were in one place, devoting themselves to prayer. The Holy Spirit came to teach the Church; to recall for her everything Jesus said and to form her in a life of prayer. The first community devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship; to the breaking of the bread and prayers. This sequence is characteristic of Church worship founded on apostolic faith, lived in charity and nourished by the Eucharist. The faithful hear these prayers and read them in the scriptures and make them their own... particularly the Psalms. Thus, the Holy Spirit keeps the memory of Jesus Christ alive in his Church at prayer. He leads her to the fullness of truth. He also inspires new formulations to express the unfathomable mystery of Christ at work in his Church. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Prayer of Petition

  • Program #: 233
  • Description: What is the most spontaneous form of prayer? The Catholic Catechism says it is the prayer of petition. Through prayer of petition, we express our awareness of our true relationship with God. We are not creatures of our own making. We did not begin ourselves, nor will we end ourselves. We are not the masters of adversity. We are sinners who know we have turned away from God. Our prayer of petition is already a turning back to Him. In the risen Christ, the Church’s petition is buoyed by hope. The first movement in the prayer of petition is asking for forgiveness. That is, says the Catechism, a prerequisite for pure and righteous prayer. In the hierarchy of petitions, we pray for the kingdom, then what is necessary to welcome and cooperate with its coming. When we share in God’s saving love,we understand that every need can become the object of petition. Christ is glorified by what we ask the Father in his name. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Prayers of Thanksgiving

  • Program #: 232
  • Description: How best to thank God? The Catholic Catechism tells us that every event and need can can become an offering of thanksgiving. St. Paul often begins his letters with thanksgiving. And the Lord Jesus is always part of such a prayer. In the first letter to Timothy, Paul writes, “give thanks in all circumstances, for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus over you.” Praise, the Catechism says that it is the form of prayer that most immediately recognizes God is God. It praises God, not just for what He has done, but simply for who He IS. “Praise embraces all other forms of prayer and carries them to Him, its Source and Goal - THE sacrifice of praise is the Eucharist. It is the pure offering of the whole body and blood of Christ to the glory of God’s name.” This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Psalms

  • Program #: 231
  • Description: Why are the Psalms such an important form of prayer? The Psalms extend from the time of King David to the coming of the Messiah. They express both commmunal and individual prayer, evidencing a deepening in prayer for oneself and others. The Catholic Catechism says the Psalms were gradually collected into 5 books known as the Psalter or Praises. They are considered the "masterwork” of prayer in the Old Testament. The psalms both commemorate the promises God has kept and anticipate the Messiah who will fulfill them definitively. Jesus both prayed the Psalms and fulfilled them. The Psalms remain essential to the prayer of the Church. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Will to Pray

  • Program #: 230
  • Description: What are the important elements to prayer? “In order to pray,” says the Catholic Catechism, “one must have the will to pray.” It is not enough to know which scripture reveals about prayer, we must learn how to pray.Through sacred tradition, in a believing and praying Church, the Holy Spirit teaches the children of God how to pray. The Catechism tells us that prayer is one of the several wellsprings where Christ awaits us to enable us to drink of the Holy Spirit. The Church exhorts all the faithful to acquire a surpassing knowledge of Christ through the reading of divine scripture. Prayer should always accompany such reading in order that a dialogue may take place between God and man. We speak to Him when we pray. He speaks to us when we read the divine oracles. Seek in reading, say spiritual writers and you will find in meditating. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: When Should We Pray?

  • Program #: 229
  • Description: When should we pray? The Catholic Catechism asserts that anytime is the right time. We learn to pray by hearing the Word of God and sharing in His paschal mystery. But the “Holy Spirit is offered to us at all times in the events of each day so that prayer can spontaneously spring up from us. Jesus teaches us that like providence, time is in the Father’s hands. We encounter Him in the present. Not yesterday. Not tomorrow. Today. Psalm 95 cautions us, “If today, you hear His voice, harden not your hearts.” Praying through the events of the day is one of the secrets of the kingdom as revealed to little children, the faithful and the poor of the beatitudes. This means that the coming of the Kingdom can influence the march of history as well as humble, everyday events. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Intercessory Prayer

  • Program #: 228
  • Description: What do we mean by intercessory prayer? The Catholic Catechism defines intercessory prayer as “asking on behalf of another”. It is a prayer attuned to God’s mercy”. It is a prayer of petition that leads us to pray as Jesus did. Jesus is the one intercessor with the Father on behalf of ALL mankind, especially sinners, because, says the Catechism, Jesus is able for all time to “save the souls who draw near to God through Him.” Jesus lives to make intercession for for such souls. When one prays intercessory prayer, he or she is looking out not just for one’s own interests, but for the interests of others, even for the one’s enemies. The intercession of Christians, recognizes no boundaries, says the Catechism. Prayers are extended for all men, for Kings or for persecutors and even for the salvation of those who reject the Gospel. This is Peggy Stanton,and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

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