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Malta Minute with the Catechism

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Why Sunday?

  • Program #: 208
  • Description: Why does the Catholic Church obligate its members to attend Mass on Sundays? For Christians, Sunday, the first day of the week or the eighth day, replaces the seventh day, the Sabbath, as the day to reserve for worshiping God. The Sabbath represents the completion of the first creation. When Jesus Christ arose from the dead on Sunday, He inaugurated the new creation. Thus, Sunday became the Lord’s Day and is now the foremost holyday of obligation in the universal Church, as we are told in paragraph 2127 of the Catholic Catechism. We are bound to attend Mass, under pain of grave sin, unless there is a serious reason for not doing so. Sundays are also called to be a day of rest. Christians are bound to abstain from work which impedes worshiping God and the joy of the Lord’s Day. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Three Major Sins Against First Commandment

  • Program #: 207
  • Description: What are the three major sins against the First Commandment? Paragraphs 2119 through 2121 in the Catholic Catechism list them as Tempting God, Sacrilege and Simony. How can we tempt God? By putting his goodness and almighty power to the test by word or deed as Satan dared to do when he commanded Jesus throw Himself down from the Temple. He was trying to force God to act. Jesus rebuked the devil with God’s word, “You shall not put the Lord thy God to the test.” The sin of sacrilege profanes the sacraments and other liturgical actions as well as persons, things or places consecrated to God. It is particularly grave when committed against the Eucharistic Jesus. Simony is the sin of buying and selling of spiritual things, named after Simon the magician who attempted to purchase spiritual power from St. Peter. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Second Commandment

  • Program #: 206
  • Description: Why does the Second Commandment forbid taking the name of the Lord in vain? According to paragraph 2143 of the Catholic Catechism, “among all the words of revelation, there is one that is unique: the revealed name of God.” God discloses Himself in his personal mystery when he confides his name to those who believe in Him. Thus we are to keep God’s name in silent adoration with love and only use it in our speech to praise, bless and glorify it. Any other use of the holy name is an abuse. If we make a promise to another, using God’s name, it must be respected in justice. If we are unfaithful to such a promise, we make God out to be a liar. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Sins Against the Second Commandment

  • Program #: 205
  • Description: Why are blasphemy, perjury and the taking of a false oath sins against the second commandment? They are sins because they are in direct contradiction to God’s directive that we do not take his name in vain. We commit blasphemy when we use God’s name improperly. We commit perjury if we call upon God to witness an oath we do not intend to honor or after swearing an oath, we fail to keep it. The Catholic Catechism, in paragraphs 2150 through 2155 states that when we take an oath, and call on God as our witness, we invoke divine truthfulness as a pledge of our truthfulness. The holiness of the Lord’s name demands that it never be used trivially or to witness to unholy authority. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Obedience to all in the Fourth Commandment

  • Program #: 204
  • Description: Does the Fourth Commandment only order us to honor our Father and our Mother? According to the Catholic Catechism, pp. 2197, it also obliges us to give honor and respect to all, whom for our good, God has vested with his authority. Respecting the Fourth Commandment, says the Catechism, brings its own reward, not only with spiritual fruits, but temporal benefits of peace and prosperity; whereas failure to observe the commandment brings harm to individuals and communities. We are reminded that marriage and the family is ordered to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of children. The Catechism states a man and a woman united in marriage together with their children is what forms a family. God instituted the human family when he created man and woman and instructed them to “increase and multiply”. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: No Work on the Sabbath?

  • Program #: 203
  • Description: Why should we do no work on the Sabbath as the third commandment demands? The Catholic Catechism, beginning with paragraph 2168 reminds us that in 6 days, the Lord God made the heaven and the earth, the sea and all that is in them. On the 7th day He rested, thereby blessing and hallowing the Sabbath. The Sabbath is also a memorial of Israel’s liberation from Egypt. The Sabbath is a sign of God’s irrevocable covenant with Israel. Thus, the day is to be set apart as holy and for the praise of god, his work of creation and his saving action on behalf of Israel. God set a model for human action. If the almighty Creator could take a day off for rest and refreshment, so should his creatures. For Christians, Sunday replaces Sabbath observance because it is the day Jesus rose from the dead and ushered in the new creation. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Vocation of Humanity

  • Program #: 202
  • Description: What is humanity’s vocation? According to the catholic catechism (pp.1877) it is to show forth the image of god and to be transformed into the father’s only son, Jesus Christ. God is the end to which all men are called. The catechism says there is a certain resemblance between the fraternal union that human beings are to establish among themselves and the divine union of the holy trinity in truth and love. Love of neighbor is inseparable from love of god. We humans need society. Society is not an add-on for us but a requirement of our nature. Through our exchange with others, through mutual service, through dialogue with our brothers and sisters, we develop our potential and thus respond to our vocation. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: The Fourth Commandment

  • Program #: 201
  • Description: What is the essence of the Fourth Commandment? In ordering us to honor our mother and our father, the Lord God has willed that after Him, we should revere our parents to whom we owe life and who have handed on to us the knowledge of God. The Catholic Catechism says the fourth commandment shows us the order of charity. It introduces the subsequent commandments concerned with special respect for life, marriage, earthly goods and speech. It constitutes one of the foundations of the social doctrines of the Church. It is expressed specifically to children regarding their relationship to their parents because it is the most universal, but it also involves ties of kinship to the extended family and encompasses duties to elders, ancestors, pupils to teachers, employees to employers, citizens to their country and to those who govern it. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: First Among The Commandments

  • Program #: 200
  • Description: When asked which commandments were first in rank of importance, Jesus responded, “‘Hear O Israel: the Lord our God is one and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’” The Lord concluded, “There is no other commandment greater than these.” Paragraph 2196 in the Catholic Catechism quotes St. Paul as saying, “He who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law.” Why? If you love your neighbor, you will do him no harm. All the Commandments, says Paul, are involved in loving your neighbor as yourself. The Commandments forbidding adultery, murder, stealing, coveting are summed up in that one sentence. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

Malta Minute with the Catechism: Atheism and Agnosticism

  • Program #: 199
  • Description: What are atheism and agnosticism? How are they similar and how do they differ? The Catholic Catechism calls atheism “one of the most serious problems of our times”. In paragraphs 2123 through 2127, the Catechism says the term covers many very different phenomena such as practical materialism which restricts man’s needs to space and time. Humanism considers man to be an end to himself, the sole make and in control of his own history. A third form of atheism is liberation which seeks to free man through economic and social liberation, claiming that religion by its very nature thwarts man’s emancipation by holding that there is an after and better life, thus deceiving man and discouraging man from working for a better life here on earth. An agnostic may not specifically deny the existence of God, but they may live as if He does not exist. This is Peggy Stanton and this has been the Order of Malta’s Minute with the Catechism.

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